Integration of Black Schools

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Tom Palven
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Integration of Black Schools

Post by Tom Palven » Mon Nov 12, 2018 8:29 am

Marge and I, and granddaughter Jessica went to an interesting meeting of the West Nassau Historical Society at the old train depot in Callahan, FL, Saturday evening.

Nassau County is in the northeast corner of Florida bordering Jacksonville to the south and Georgia to the north.

The meeting was held to promote a December reunion of attendees of the all black Peck High School (which served grades 1 through 12) and Pine Forest School in Jacksonville which also served black Nassau County children before integration was mandated in i969.
https://digitalcommons.unf.edu/historic ... main/3770/

Speakers included people who had migrated to Detroit, MI and other cites in the rust belt and the Northeast , but have returned to Nassau County after retirement, which they agreed is "home."

They spoke enthusiastically about some of the teachers and sports coaches they had in school and how they influenced their lives, and also praised Julius Rosenwald, president of Sears Roebuck, who created a foundation to build schools for blacks in the South, including the Peck School.
https://savingplaces.org/places/rosenwa ... -ks2kpFyUk

Driving home, both Marge and I said that although the whole meeting was interesting, the most interesting thing for was that the snap-bang, transition from total segregation to total integration in Nassau County in 1969 apparently went so smoothly.

One of the speakers touched on this by mentioning that "all us rural folks get along," and both the black and white attendees just nodded and seemed to take this for granted.

Coincidentally, there is now a multi-media, interactive, Smithsonian Institute presentation about the history of farming in America set up in the same train depot that this meeting took place, and sure enough, there are lots of photos taken after the Civil War, but before desegregation, that show blacks and whites together in jackets and ties, presumably agricultural agents, sales representatives, and farmers discussing the merits of various new agricultural equipment and products.

All in all it was quite an eye opener for both Marge and me and our granddaughter.
Last edited by Tom Palven on Mon Nov 12, 2018 12:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Integration of Black Schools

Post by TJrandom » Mon Nov 12, 2018 9:25 am

OK, but I dare say that in the corner of that train station there undoubtedly was a 'For Colored Only' water fountain and nearby a 'Whites Only' water fountain. Maybe not in 1969 - but surely as late as the early 50s.