EFT peer review articles..

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Shen1986
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EFT peer review articles..

Post by Shen1986 » Tue Aug 12, 2014 8:11 am

A user has posted a list of “peer-review” articles on Emotional Freedom Technique. I decided to have a closer look at it to show why I do not believe it. However first things first lest first write what is EFT and there are already problems with it:
Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) is a form of counseling intervention that draws on various theories of alternative medicine including acupuncture, neuro-linguistic programming, energy medicine, and Thought Field Therapy (TFT). It is best known through Gary Craig's EFT Handbook, published in the late 1990s, and related books and workshops by a variety of teachers. EFT and similar techniques are often discussed under the umbrella term "energy psychology".

Advocates claim that the technique may be used to treat a wide variety of physical and psychological disorders, and as a simple form of self-administered therapy.[1] The Skeptical Inquirer describes the foundations of EFT as "a hodgepodge of concepts derived from a variety of sources [primarily] the ancient Chinese philosophy of chi, which is thought to be the 'life force' that flows throughout the body." The existence of this life force is "not empirically supported".[3]

EFT has no benefit as a therapy beyond the placebo effect or any known-effective psychological techniques that may be provided in addition to the purported "energy" technique.[4] It is generally characterized as pseudoscience and has not garnered significant support in clinical psychology.
Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_ ... _Technique" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

So lets point out the other problems with this:

1. Problem: It was already criticized and its results were really pathetic:
The Skeptical Inquirer describes the foundations of EFT as "a hodgepodge of concepts derived from a variety of sources [primarily] the ancient Chinese philosophy of chi, which is thought to be the 'life force' that flows throughout the body." The existence of this life force is "not empirically supported".[3]

EFT has no benefit as a therapy beyond the placebo effect or any known-effective psychological techniques that may be provided in addition to the purported "energy" technique.[4] It is generally characterized as pseudoscience and has not garnered significant support in clinical psychology.
Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_ ... _Technique" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

More here:
Mechanism

Proponents of EFT and other similar treatments believe that tapping/stimulating acupuncture points provide the basis for significant improvement in psychological problems.[5] However, the theory and mechanisms underlying the supposed effectiveness of EFT have "no evidentiary support" "in the entire history of the sciences of biology, anatomy, physiology, neurology, physics, or psychology." Researchers have described the theoretical model for EFT as "frankly bizarre" and "pseudoscientific."[4] One review noted one of the highest quality studies found no evidence that the location of tapping points made any difference, and attributed effects to well-known psychological mechanisms including distraction and breathing therapy.[6][4]

An article in the Skeptical Inquirer argued that there is no plausible mechanism to explain how the specifics of EFT could add to its effectiveness, and they have been described as unfalsifiable and therefore pseudoscientific.[3] Evidence has not been found for the existence of meridians.[7]
Research quality

EFT has no useful effect as a therapy beyond the placebo effect or any known-effective psychological techniques that may be used with the purported "energy" technique, but proponents of EFT have published material claiming otherwise. Their work, however, is flawed and so unreliable: high-quality research has never confirmed that EFT is effective.[4]

A 2009 review found "methodological flaws" in research studies that had reported "small successes" for EFT and the related Tapas Acupressure Technique. The review concluded that positive results may be "attributable to well-known cognitive and behavioral techniques that are included with the energy manipulation. Psychologists and researchers should be wary of using such techniques, and make efforts to inform the public about the ill effects of therapies that advertise miraculous claims."[8]
Reception

A Delphi poll of an expert panel of psychologists rated EFT on a scale describing how discredited EFT has been in the field of psychology. On average, this panel found EFT had a score of 3.8 on a scale from 1.0 to 5.0, with 3.0 meaning "possibly discredited" and a 4.0 meaning "probably discredited."[9] A book examining pseudoscientific practices in psychology characterized EFT as one of a number of "fringe psychotherapeutic practices,"[10] and a psychiatry handbook states EFT has "all the hallmarks of pseudoscience."[11]

EFT, along with its predecessor, Thought Field Therapy, has been dismissed with warnings to avoid their use by publications such as the The Skeptic's Dictionary[12] and Quackwatch.[13]

Proponents of EFT and other energy psychology therapies have been "particularly interested" in seeking "scientific credibility" despite the implausible proposed mechanisms for EFT.[4] A 2008 review by energy psychology proponent David Feinstein concluded that energy psychology was a potential "rapid and potent treatment for a range psychological conditions."[14] However, this work by Feinstein has been widely criticized. One review criticized Feinstein's methodology, noting he ignored several research papers that did not show positive effects of EFT, and that Feinstein did not disclose his conflict of interest as an owner of a website that sells energy psychology products such as books and seminars, against the best practice of research publication.[15] Another review criticized Feintstein's conclusion, which was based on research of weak quality and instead concluded that any positive effects of EFT are due to the more traditional psychological techniques rather than any putative "energy" manipulation.[8] A book published on the subject evidence based treatment of substance abuse called Feinstein's review "incomplete and misleading" and an example of a poorly performed evidence based review of research.[16]

Feinstein published another review in 2012, concluding that energy psychology techniques "consistently demonstrated strong effect sizes and other positive statistical results that far exceed chance after relatively few treatment sessions".[5] This review was also criticized, where again was noted Feinstein dismissed higher quality studies that showed no effects of EFT, in favor of methodologically weaker studies that did show a positive effect.[4]
Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_ ... _Technique" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

So lets now look on the whole list of the so called “peer-review” evidence for EFT. It is quite long so I will not post every article here. The whole list can be seen here:

https://www.caiet.org/research-and-reso ... -articles/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

I will divide it through authors and journals to point out why I do not believe in it:

Lets start with Church Dawson:
Church, Dawson. (2010a). Your DNA is Not Your Destiny: Behavioral Epigenetics and the Role of Emotions in Health. Anti Aging Medical Therapeutics, 2010, October, 13.

Church, Dawson. (2010b). The Treatment of Combat Trauma in Veterans Using EFT: A Pilot Protocol. Traumatology, (2010), 15(1), 45-55.

Church, Dawson & Brooks, Audrey. (2010a). The Effect of a Brief EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) Self-Intervention on Anxiety, Depression, Pain and Cravings in Healthcare Workers. Integrative Medicine: A Clinician’s Journal, (2010), Oct/Nov.

Church, Dawson, Piña, Oscar; Reategui, Carla; & Brooks, Audrey. (2010). Single Session Reduction of the Intensity of Traumatic Memories in Abused Adolescents: A Randomized Controlled Trial. In peer review at the journal Psychological Trauma.

Church, Dawson and Brooks, Audrey. (2008). The Effect of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) on Psychological Symptoms in Addiction Treatment. This data was presented at Science and Consciousness, the Tenth Annual Energy Psychology conference, Toronto, October 24, 2008.

Church, D., Brooks, A. (2010b). A Review of the EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) Method, Research, and Application. Published in Integrative Medicine: A Clinician’s Journal, 2010 August/September.

Church, D., Brooks, A. (2010c). Application of Emotional Freedom Techniques. Published in Integrative Medicine, 2010, Aug/Sept.

Church, D., De Asis, M., Brooks, A. (2010) Brief Group Intervention Using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) for Depression in College Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial. These data were presented at a poster session at the 12th International Energy Psychology Conference, San Diego, June 3-9, 2010. They have been submitted for publication and are in peer review.

Church, D., Hawk, C, Brooks, A., Toukolehto, O., Wren, M., Dinter, I., Stein, P. (2010).
Psychological Trauma in Veterans using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A Randomized Controlled Trial. These data were presented at the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Seattle, Washington, April 7-10, 2010. In peer review.

Church, D. (2009). The Treatment of Combat Trauma in Veterans using EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): A Pilot Protocol. Traumatology, March 15:1.

Church, D. (2009). The Effect of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) on Athletic Performance: A Randomized Controlled Blind Trial. The Open Sports Sciences Journal, 2009, 2, 94-99.

Church, D., Piña, O., Reategui, C., & Brooks, A. (2009). Single session reduction of the intensity of traumatic memories in abused adolescents: A randomized controlled trial. Paper presented at the Eleventh Annual Toronto Energy Psychology Conference, October 15 – 19, 2009. This study is in peer review at the Journal of Child Sexual Abuse.

Church, D., & Geronilla, L. (2009). Psychological symptom change in veterans after six sessions of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques): an observational study. International Journal of Healing and Caring, January, 9:1.


Church, D. (2008c). Measuring Physiological Markers of Emotional Trauma: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Mind-Body Therapies. Paper presented at tenth annual ACEP (Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology) conference, May 2008).

Church, D. (2008d). The Effect of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) on Psychological Symptoms: A Limited Replication. Presented at Science and Consciousness, the Tenth Annual Energy Psychology Conference, Toronto, Oct 24.

Church, D. (2008e). The Effect of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) on Psychological Symptoms in Addiction Treatment. Presented at Science and Consciousness, the Tenth Annual Energy Psychology Conference, Toronto, Oct 24.

Church, Dawson and Brooks, Audrey. (2008). The Effect of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) on Psychological Symptoms in Addiction Treatment. This data was presented at Science and Consciousness, the Tenth Annual Energy Psychology conference, Toronto, October 24, 2008.
Taken from: https://www.caiet.org/research-and-reso ... -articles/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

2. Problem: Church Dawson is a strong alternative medicine proponent and woo believer:
Brief Biography

Dawson Church, PhD, is an award-winning author whose best-selling book, The Genie in Your Genes, (http://www.YourGeniusGene.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;) has been hailed by reviewers as a breakthrough in our understanding of the link between emotions and genetics. He founded the National Institute for Integrative Healthcare (http://www.NIIH.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;) to study and implement promising evidence-based psychological and medical techniques. His groundbreaking research has been published in prestigious scientific journals. He is the editor of Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, a peer-reviewed professional journal (http://www.EnergyPsychologyJournal.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;). He shares how to apply these breakthroughs to health and athletic performance through EFT Universe (http://www.EFTUniverse.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;), one of the largest alternative medicine sites on the web.Vitae (pdf)
Taken from: http://dawsonchurch.com/vitae/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

More info:
Dawson Church is a health writer and researcher who has edited or authored a number of books in the fields of health, psychology, and spirituality. His principal work is The Genie in Your Genes, (http://www.YourGeniusGene.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;), which reviews the research linking consciousness, emotion, and gene expression (USA BookNews “Best Health Book”). He has published many scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals, collaborating with scholars at various universities on outcome studies of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and anxiety. He is the editor of the peer-reviewed journal Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, and Treatment, (http://www.EnergyPsychologyJournal.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;), and general manager of Energy Psychology Press, which maintains a research bibliography and case histories at EFT Universe (http://www.EFTUniverse.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;), one of the most-visited alternative medicine sites on the web.

In his undergraduate and graduate work at Baylor University, he became the first student to successfully graduate from the academically rigorous University Scholar’s program in 1979. He earned his doctorate in Integrative Healthcare at Holos University under the mentorship of neurosurgeon Norman Shealy, MD, PhD, founder of the American Holistic Medical Association. After an early career in book publishing as editor then president of Aslan Publishing (http://www.aslanpublishing.com" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;), Church went on to receive a postgraduate PhD in Natural Medicine, as well as clinical certification in Energy Psychology (CEHP license # 2016). Church and Shealy coauthored a book called Soul Medicine (http://www.SoulMedicine.net" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;), which surveys the role of consciousness in medicine from the earliest times to the modern day. In 2007 Church founded the National Institute for Integrative Healthcare (http://www.NIIH.org" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;), a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit institution dedicated to education and research into evidence-based healing modalities. He has worked with over a thousand pain clients, with average symptom reductions of 68% 16, and co-developed the Skinny Genes weight loss program.11
Taken from: http://dawsonchurch.com/vitae/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Also this leaves me skeptical:
RESEARCH

Church performed two pilot studies of EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).1, 2 They demonstrated highly significant results despite a small sample size, indicating a robust treatment effect. This led to a randomized controlled trial, published in the oldest peer-reviewed psychiatry journal in North America, showing highly significant results. 3 It demonstrated that 86% of veterans with clinical PTSD were sub-clinical after six sessions of EFT, and remained so on follow-up. A concurrent study by an independent research team in Britain’s National Health Service (NHS) 4 showed similar findings, indicating that EFT meets the criteria of the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 12 Task Force as an “empirically validated treatment” for PTSD.5, 6

Church collaborated with Garret Yount, PhD a molecular biologist California Pacific Medical Center, and professor Audrey Brooks, PhD, a research psychologist at the University of Arizona at Tucson, on a novel study of stress hormones.7 The triple-blind randomized controlled trial, published in the peer-reviewed psychiatry Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, compared salivary cortisol levels in 83 subjects who received an hour of either talk therapy, EFT, or rest. Anxiety and depression declined significantly more in the EFT group than the talk therapy group, while cortisol also dropped significantly. This research team’s current focus is gene expression in veterans with clinical PTSD (Clinical Trial NCT 01250431).

Church has also published studies of PTSD in teens,8 depression in college students,9 and the delivery of EFT in groups.10 Some of his other studies have found significant improvements in mental health, pain, weight loss, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and addictive cravings.11,12,13,14,15 A study of PTSD symptoms in 218 veterans and spouses who received group EFT found most were sub-clinical after treatment.10 A study of 216 healthcare workers published in the journal Integrative Medicine demonstrated a highly significant 45% drop in psychological symptoms after EFT group treatment.16 These results are consistent with reports by other independent research teams.17,18

Church conducted and published the first study of EFT for sports performance, finding that a single brief session of EFT significantly improved the free throw performance of basketball players.19 An independent replication using soccer free kicks as the performance measure found similar results.20 Another study in which Church was co-investigator found an increase in confidence and a decrease in anxiety in female volleyball players.21

Church has also contributed to reviews of energy psychology research published in APA and A4M (American Academy of Anti-Aging Medicine) journals, emphasizing the medical benefits of effective psychotherapy.22,23,24 In a paper reviewing the research base of energy psychology for PTSD, Church concludes that treatment is distinguished by seven characteristics. These are: “(1) the limited number of treatment sessions usually required to remediate PTSD; (2) the depth, breadth, and longevity of treatment effects; (3) the low risk of adverse events; (4) the limited commitment to training required for basic application of the method; (5) its efficacy when delivered in group format; (6) its simultaneous effect on a wide range of psychological and physiological symptoms, and (7) its suitability for non-traditional delivery methods such as online and telephone sessions.”25
Taken from: http://dawsonchurch.com/vitae/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

More info:
Dawson Church

Education:
Baylor University BA Communications 1979
Baylor University University Scholars Program 1979
Holos University ThD Integrative Healthcare* 2005
Universal University PhD Natural Medicine# 2006


Credentials & Affiliations
Certified Energy Health Practitioner ACEP CEHP license number #2016
Service Activities
Assn for Comprehensive Energy Psych Research Director 2007-2008
Family Connection Board President 1995-2003
Cathedral of St. John the Divine Board, Earth Community 1981-1985
Baylor Institute for Foreign Policy Fellow 1977-1980
Employment
2009-present Editor Energy Psychology journal
2006-present Executive Director Soul Medicine Institute
1995-2007 President Elite Books
1990-1995 CEO Atrium Publisher’s Group
1986-1990 Publisher Aslan Publishing
1981-1985 Freelance Editor Bantam, Dell, Random
Taken from: http://dawsonchurch.com/wp-content/uplo ... on_CV1.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Holos University is a gem to behold where Dawson Church received one of his ThD titles:
Earn Your Doctorate Degree in Holistic Health at Holos University


Welcome to our website for Holos University, a holistic health institution that is built on the idealistic mission of educating a large base of scholars from around the nation, on subjects related to medical intuition and energy medicine, through a variety of self-development methods and interactive distance learning. We have spent over a decade generating innovative holistic research to help substantiate knowledge about the comprehensive benefits of spiritually oriented holistic health.

Our holistic university uses integrative healthcare studies to establish a defining theme throughout our educational courses. We strive to properly educate our student in areas such as theological and spiritual understandings, cultural sensitivity, and personal integration. Holos University offers a range of courses so that scholars can pursue interests in many areas of holistic health and energy medicine. We offer numerous educational paths to pursue, such as obtaining a graduate degree with a special emphasis in spiritual psychology or spiritual direction.

Learn more about Holos University and our holistic graduate degrees.


Energy Medicine and Holistic Health

Our staff at HU is devoted to holistic health and the spirituality that is an important component in this field. Our faculty’s desire to teach the benefits and inner workings of spiritual studies and how they benefit our health and understanding of ourselves can truly be felt through their teaching approaches.

Generally, energy medicine and holistic health encompass a wide range of integrative and subtle energy approaches to healing. All of the courses in the curriculum at Holos University involve recognition of subtle energy and energy medicine as well as the integration of body, mind, and spirit.

At Holos University, you can earn a Masters, Doctorate, or Post-Doctorate degree in one of our holistic graduate degree programs. We offer special emphasis tracks in Medical Intuition as well as Counseling Intuition, Spiritual Direction, Transformational Psychology, and Integrative Holistic Health.
Taken from: http://www.holosuniversity.net/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Here I am only quoting the relevant and skeptical stuff that they are religious like:
HOLOS UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SEMINARY
MISSION STATEMENT

Holos University Graduate Seminary prepares students to integrate Universal Principles of Spirituality and Holistic Health through self-development, scholarly exploration and research, and compassionate service.


What is it to be human? How can we effectively address the many dimensions of being human in order to create health and wholeness, for ourselves, for the planet, and for all sentient beings? Every course at Holos University explores aspects of these essential dimensions. We invite you to explore with us.
INTRODUCTION

Holos University uses blended distance learning in which most of the academic learning is done working with instructors using email, conference calls, and webinars. There are a few core courses that require attendance at a 1 - 3 day residency program. Most residencies take place in early September during Campus Week at Unity Village, Missouri. The mystical traditions of virtually all religions contain substantial references that address the subtle physical energies of the body, the transpersonal aspects of the mind, and the expressive activity of the spirit. These traditions exist at the very core of holistic mysticism, spiritual direction, counseling intuition, transformational psychology, and integrative healthcare. Holos University Graduate Seminary (HU) emphasizes ecumenical spiritual approaches that fulfill a growing need for an inclusive, holistic, and creative approach to life in contemporary communities.

As a Seminary, HU focuses upon the spiritual aspects of its studies and research. As a University, HU strives to uphold the highest academic standards in teaching and research and seeks to serve as a bridge between academic and religious institutions.
The educational design of the HU program, centered on these basic tenets, inevitably leads to a new, broader, and more expansive understanding of consciousness and human transformation.
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
THEOLOGICAL AND SPIRITUAL UNDERSTANDINGS that demonstrate an appreciation for the essential teachings of the world’s great religions and a broad ecumenical, interpersonal, and cross-cultural understanding of faith and spirituality;
COMPETENCY in holistic health that supports creative personal growth, life-long learning, and competence in holistically oriented physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual health and well-being;
CRITICAL THINKING AND CLEAR COMMUNICATION that promote competence in independent scholarly and scientific explorations and research using rigorous protocols, and that enhance an ability to articulate effectively intellectual, theological, and spiritual concepts and values;
Taken from: http://www.holosuniversity.org/about-us.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

However lets move on with David Feinstein:
Feinstein, David. (2010). The Case For Energy Psychology. Psychotherapy Networker, Nov/Dec 2010.

Feinstein, David. (2010). Rapid Treatment of PTSD: Why Psychological Exposure with Acupoint Tapping May Be Effective. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 47(3), 385-402.

Feinstein, David & Church, Dawson. (2010). Modulating Gene Expression through Psychotherapy: The Contribution of Non-Invasive Somatic Interventions. Review of General Psychology, an American Psychological Association journal.

Feinstein, David. (2009). Controversies in Energy Psychology. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, 1(1), 45-56.

Feinstein, D. (2008a). Energy psychology: a review of the preliminary evidence. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training. 45(2), 199-213.

Feinstein, D. (2008b) Energy psychology in disaster relief. Traumatology 141:1, 124-137.

Andrade, Joaquin and Feinstein, David. (2004). Preliminary Report of the First Large-Scale Study of Energy Psychology. This research, which was initiated in the late 1980s and included various studies over a 14-year period, was published in 2004 in an appendix to David Feinstein’s Energy Psychology Interactive: Rapid Interventions for Lasting Change. Ashland, OR: Innersource.
Taken from: https://www.caiet.org/research-and-reso ... -articles/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

David Feinstein was criticized:
Proponents of EFT and other energy psychology therapies have been "particularly interested" in seeking "scientific credibility" despite the implausible proposed mechanisms for EFT.[4] A 2008 review by energy psychology proponent David Feinstein concluded that energy psychology was a potential "rapid and potent treatment for a range psychological conditions."[14] However, this work by Feinstein has been widely criticized. One review criticized Feinstein's methodology, noting he ignored several research papers that did not show positive effects of EFT, and that Feinstein did not disclose his conflict of interest as an owner of a website that sells energy psychology products such as books and seminars, against the best practice of research publication.[15] Another review criticized Feintstein's conclusion, which was based on research of weak quality and instead concluded that any positive effects of EFT are due to the more traditional psychological techniques rather than any putative "energy" manipulation.[8] A book published on the subject evidence based treatment of substance abuse called Feinstein's review "incomplete and misleading" and an example of a poorly performed evidence based review of research.[16]

Feinstein published another review in 2012, concluding that energy psychology techniques "consistently demonstrated strong effect sizes and other positive statistical results that far exceed chance after relatively few treatment sessions".[5] This review was also criticized, where again was noted Feinstein dismissed higher quality studies that showed no effects of EFT, in favor of methodologically weaker studies that did show a positive effect.[4]
Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_ ... _Technique" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Now L. Pulos:
Swingle, P., Pulos, L., & Swingle, M. K. (2005). Neurophysiological Indicators of EFT Treatment Of Post Traumatic Stress. Journal of Subtle Energies & Energy Medicine. 15, 75-86.
Taken from: https://www.caiet.org/research-and-reso ... -articles/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

L. Pulos is a woo proponent and a believer in EFT:
In 1970, Lee launched his career as a business man and entrepreneur. He and his brothers started The Old Spaghetti Factory chain – a venture that prospered to become a 23 million dollar a year, 22 location operations in Canada, the United States and Australia. Lee served as the Chief Operating Officer before selling it to The Keg restaurant chain in 1980.

Lee traveled and researched cross-cultural tradition healing practices in Brazil, West Africa, India, the Philippines and Mexico and has blended his experience with the western model of mind / body healing.
Taken from: http://drpulos.com/about/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Here are his products. One is even with psychics:
My Books

From Hypnosis to spirituality, explore captivating journeys to the edge of conventional beliefs. Miracles And Other Realities is a rediscovery and renewal of our basic-beings and spirituality. A true story about a gifted psychic Thomaz from Brazil.

» Shop for a Book
My DVDs

Are you sick of stress, anxiety and worry? Do you feel out of control – or at the mercy of your emotions? Challenged by an addiction? Discover how you can easily get on top of stress, anxiety, and a negative attitude. Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT) is one of the most powerful and effective therapeutic tools in the world for creating remarkable and impressive personal change and growth.

» Shop for DVD Products
My CDs

Titles such as Mentally Fit Forever and my best seller Biology Of Empowerment, I will take you on self-healing, self-empowering journeys to achieve any external outcome you desire. The Biology of Empowerment methods state it all…”Permanent personal transformation is possible and it all starts at a cellular level.”

» Shop for CD Products
My MP3s

Note: Select titles are now also available on iTunes (search for “Dr. Lee Pulos”)

Developing A Winning Attitude, Healing Imagery For Cancer, Increase Sexual Energy and Reduce Stress are just some of my popular MP3 programs available for direct download. Benefit from short Hypnosis, Self-Talk and Subliminal programs designed to achieve results quickly.
Taken from: http://drpulos.com/products/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

There are also seminars:
Seminars

Peak Performance In Life

Date: Saturday November 2nd, 2013

Location: Vancouver Island Conference Centre, Lantzville Room – Nanaimo, BC

Registration/Information: To register call 250-824-5006

About: With Dr. Paola Lake. Build and strengthen self-confidence, change limiting beliefs, learn to use self-hypnosis, learn goal setting & learn a powerful tool for change: Emotional Freedom Technique.
Taken from: http://drpulos.com/seminars/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Some articles is “peer-reviewed” in Explore:
Salas, Maria; Brooks, Audrey; Rowe, Jack. (2011). The Immediate Effect of a Brief Energy Psychology Intervention (EFT) on Specific Phobias: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, (2010), 6(5).

Benor, D. J., Ledger, K., Toussaint, L., Hett, G., & Zaccaro, D. (2009). Pilot study of Emotional Freedom Technique (EFT), Wholistic Hybrid derived from EMDR and EFT (WHEE) and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for Treatment of Test Anxiety in University Students. Explore, November/December 2009, Vol. 5, No. 6.
Taken from: https://www.caiet.org/research-and-reso ... -articles/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Explore:
EXPLORE: The Journal of Science & Healing addresses the scientific principles behind, and applications of, evidence-based healing practices from a wide variety of sources, including conventional, alternative, and cross-cultural medicine. It is an interdisciplinary journal that explores the healing arts, consciousness, spirituality, eco-environmental issues, and basic science as all these fields relate to health.
Taken from: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/explor ... d-healing/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Explore executive editor is also in the editorial board of Energy Psychology:
Larry Dossey, MD, Explore journal
Taken from: http://energypsychologyjournal.org/editorial-board/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Here we can see that Larry Dossey is the executive editor of Explore:
Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing

Since 2005, Dr. Dossey has served as an executive editor of this prestigious peer-reviewed journal, which covers the fields of integrative medicine, environmental health, spirituality, and conciousness-related health issues.
Taken from: http://www.dosseydossey.com/larry/therapies.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Larry Dossey also worked with Sheldrake and other woo believers:
Manifesto foraPost-MaterialistScience | MarioBeauregard,PhD,GaryE.Schwartz,PhD,LisaMiller,PhD, Larry Dossey,MD,AlexanderMoreira-Almeida,MD,PhD, Marilyn Schlitz,PhD,RupertSheldrake,PhD,andCharlesTart,PhD
Taken from: http://download.journals.elsevierhealth ... 001165.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Page: 1

Here is a skeptical look on one of his books: http://www.gpposner.com/Healing_Words.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Also here:
http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/the ... ry-dossey/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

A lot of these articles is “peer-reviewed” in Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, and Treatment which is a woo journal:
Palmer-Hoffman, Julie & Brooks, Audrey. (2011). Psychological Symptom Change after Group Application of Emotional Freedom Techniques. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, 3(1), 57-72.

Stein, Phyllis, & Brooks, Audrey. Efficacy of EFT Provided by Coaches vs. Licensed Therapists in Veterans with PTSD. (2011). Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, and Treatment, 3(1).

Burke, Larry. (2010). Single Session EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) for Stress-Related Symptoms After Motor Vehicle Accidents. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, (2010), 2(1), 65-72.

Feinstein, David. (2009). Controversies in Energy Psychology. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, 1(1), 45-56.

Gallo, Fred. (2009). Energy Psychology in Rehabilitation: Origins, Clinical Applications, and Theory. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, (2009), 1(1), 57-72.

Lane, James. (2009). The Neurochemistry of Counterconditioning: Acupressure Desensitization in Psychotherapy. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, (2009), 1(1), 31-44.

Lubin, Hari and Schneider, Tiffany. (2009). Change Is Possible: EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) with Life-Sentence and Veteran Prisoners at San Quentin State Prison. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, (2009), 1(1), 83-88.

Schulz, Kirsten. (2009). Integrating Energy Psychology into Treatment for Adult Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, 1(1), 15-22.

Stone, Barbara; Leyden, Lori; Fellows, Bert. (2009). Energy Psychology Treatment for Posttraumatic Stress in Genocide Survivors in a Rwandan Orphanage: A Pilot Investigation. Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, & Treatment, 1(1), 73-82.
Taken from: https://www.caiet.org/research-and-reso ... -articles/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Here is the information about the journal:
Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, and Treatment is a peer-reviewed professional journal dedicated to reporting developments in the field of energy psychology (EP) that are of interest to healthcare professionals and researchers.

It contains original empirical research into the efficacy of EP methods; theoretical, experimental and basic science papers illuminating the mechanisms of action of EP; clinical insights on the application of EP to various populations, and interfaces with other interventions; book reviews, and abstracts published in other journals that are of relevance to the EP field.
Taken from: http://energypsychologyjournal.org/about/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Energy Psychology is based on old and traditional stuff again thus alternative medicine and more woo:
Energy Psychology traces its roots to Traditional Chinese Medicine and qi gong and to the work of modern pioneers such as George Goodheart, a chiropractor and the founder of Applied Kinesiology, Australian psychiatrist John Diamond, and psychologist Roger Callahan, the founder of Thought Field Therapy.
Taken from: http://www.noetic.org/noetic/issue-thir ... sychology/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Here is the editorial board and many people there are woo believers, Dawson Church was already covered. Lee Pulos also, David Feinstein, Larry Dossey also:
Editorial Board
EDITOR: Dawson Church, PhD


BOARD
Harvey Baker, PhD, Queens College, City University of New York
Audrey Brooks, PhD, University of Arizona, Tucson
Hyla Cass, MD, Pacific Integrative Medical Clinic
Linda Grant de Pauw, PhD, George Washington University
Larry Dossey, MD, Explore journal
Charles Elder, MD, Kaiser Permanente
John Freedom, ACEP Research Committee
David Feinstein, PhD, Energy Medicine Institute
Fred Gallo, PhD, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Robert Hoss, Dreamscience Foundation
Dorothea Hover-Kramer, EdD, RN, Behavioral Health Consultants
Gail Ironson, MD, PhD, University of Miami
Meg Jordan, PhD, RN, California Institute of Integral Studies
Stanley Krippner, PhD, Saybrook University
Eric Leskowitz, MD, Harvard Medical School
Fred Luskin, PhD, Stanford University
Philip Mollon, MD, Lister Hospital
James Oschman, PhD, Nature’s Own Research Association
Lee Pulos, PhD, University of British Columbia
Ron Ruden, MD, PhD, Yaffe, Ruden and Associates
Norman Shealy, MD, PhD, Holos Institutes of Health
Phyllis Stein, PhD, Washington University School of Medicine
Charles Tart, PhD, University of California at Davis
Jack Wagoner, PhD, University of California at Berkeley
Berney Williams, PhD, Energy Medicine University
Taken from: http://energypsychologyjournal.org/editorial-board/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Lets take a look on the others:

Harvey Baker, PhD, Queens College, City University of New York is already dead. I did not know they have even ghosts in their board:
Sadly, I have to report that my good friend and major Emotional Freedom Technique
(EFT) research colleague, Dr. A. Harvey Baker, died peacefully in his room at the
ACEP conference in San Diego June 5. He was attending that conference in his role as
Director of Research for ACEP.
Taken from: http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.energypsyc ... summer.pdf" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
Page: 1

Audrey Brooks, PhD, University of Arizona, Tucson. She worked on homeopathy before with strang results and worked with Church Dawson and Gary Schwartz:

Work with Church:
Church collaborated with Garret Yount, PhD a molecular biologist California Pacific Medical Center, and professor Audrey Brooks, PhD, a research psychologist at the University of Arizona at Tucson, on a novel study of stress hormones.7 The triple-blind randomized controlled trial, published in the peer-reviewed psychiatry Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, compared salivary cortisol levels in 83 subjects who received an hour of either talk therapy, EFT, or rest. Anxiety and depression declined significantly more in the EFT group than the talk therapy group, while cortisol also dropped significantly. This research team’s current focus is gene expression in veterans with clinical PTSD (Clinical Trial NCT 01250431).
Taken from: http://dawsonchurch.com/vitae/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Work on Homeopathy with Schwartz:
Advances in integrative nanomedicine for improving infectious disease treatment in public health
Iris R. Bell, Gary E. Schwartz, Nancy N. Boyer, Mary Koithan, Audrey J. Brooks
Taken from: http://www.europeanintegrativemedicinej ... S1876-3820(12" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;)01114-6/abstract

The whole research is garbage no wonder it was published here European Journal of Integrative Medicine:
Methods

We searched Pubmed articles in English with keywords related to nanoparticles and nanomedicine. Nanotechnology terms were also combined with keywords for drug delivery, infectious diseases, herbs, antioxidants, homeopathy, and adaptation.
Results

NPs are very small forms of material substances, measuring 1–100nm along at least one dimension. Compared with bulk forms, NPs’ large ratio of surface-area-to-volume confers increased reactivity and adsorptive capacity, with unique electromagnetic, chemical, biological, and quantum properties. Nanotechnology uses natural botanical agents for green manufacturing of less toxic NPs.
Discussion

Nanoparticle herbs and nutriceuticals can treat infections via improved bioavailability and antiinflammatory, antioxidant, and immunomodulatory effects. Recent studies demonstrate that homeopathic medicines may contain source and/or silica nanoparticles because of their traditional manufacturing processes. Homeopathy, as a form of nanomedicine, has a promising history of treating epidemic infectious diseases, including malaria, leptospirosis and HIV/AIDS, in addition to acute upper respiratory infections. Adaptive changes in the host's complex networks underlie effects.
Taken from: http://www.europeanintegrativemedicinej ... S1876-3820(12" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;)01114-6/abstract

Also here work on homeopathy: http://www.homeopathyjournal.net/article/S1475-4916(12" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;)00084-7/abstract

Hyla Cass, MD, Pacific Integrative Medical Clinic:
Integrative medicine, which is also called integrated medicine and integrative health in the United Kingdom,[1] combines alternative medicine with evidence-based medicine. Proponents claim that it treats the "whole person," focuses on wellness and health rather than on treating disease, and emphasizes the patient-physician relationship.[2][1][3][4]
Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrative_medicine" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Integrative medicine reception:
Integrative medicine is sometimes lumped together with alternative medicine, which has received criticism and has been called "snake oil."[10][16] A primary issue is whether alternative practices have been objectively tested. In a 1998 article in The New Republic, Arnold S. Relman, a former editor of The New England Journal of Medicine stated that "There are not two kinds of medicine, one conventional and the other unconventional, that can be practiced jointly in a new kind of 'integrative medicine.' Nor, as Andrew Weil and his friends also would have us believe, are there two kinds of thinking, or two ways to find out which treatments work and which do not. In the best kind of medical practice, all proposed treatments must be tested objectively. In the end, there will only be treatments that pass that test and those that do not, those that are proven worthwhile and those that are not".[5]

In order to objectively test alternative medicine treatments, in 1991 the U.S. government established the Office of Alternative Medicine, which in 1998 was re-established as the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) as one of the National Institutes of Health. However, skeptic Steven Novella, a neurologist at Yale School of Medicine, said that NCCAM's activities are "used to lend an appearance of legitimacy to treatments that are not legitimate".[10] The NCCAM website states that there is "emerging evidence that some of the perceived benefits are real or meaningful". NCCAM also says that "the scientific evidence is limited" and "In many instances, a lack of reliable data makes it difficult for people to make informed decisions about using integrative health care".[17]
Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrativ ... #Reception" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

More here:
Steven Salzberg has criticized the teaching of integrative medicine in medical schools, especially the inclusion of pseudoscientific subjects such as homeopathy.[24] In Salzberg's view in offering an integrative medicine course, the University of Maryland Medical School was "mis-training medical students".[24]
Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrativ ... #Reception" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Linda Grant de Pauw, PhD, George Washington University works with history:

Can be seen here: http://history.columbian.gwu.edu/linda-grant-depauw" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Charles Elder, MD, Kaiser Permanente is a alternative medicine worker:
Charles Elder, MD, MPH
Internal Medicine, Northwest Permanente, KPNW
Affiliate Investigator


Dr. Charles Elder combines his clinical practice expertise with an interest in applying alternative medicine to mainstream medical care. His research focuses on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), particularly on Ayurvedic medicine.

Dr. Elder was the principal investigator on a pilot study evaluating the feasibility of two mind-body interventions based on Chinese medicine, qigong and the Tapas Acupressure Technique®, for weight-loss maintenance in overweight and obese adults.
Taken from: http://www.kpchr.org/research/public/in ... px?InvID=6" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

John Freedom, ACEP Research Committee:
John Freedom

I am an eternal student, and a seeker of truth (both small 't' and large 'T'). While I am a student of linguistics and etymology and a lover of language, I am very aware of the inherent imprecision in language and communication. Words are 'but symbols of symbols', and the map is not the territory.

I am an educator and researcher, a catalyst and resource, a facilitator for emotional and spiritual healing. My background is experiential, rather than academic. Many years ago I attended a little school called MIT. The most useful advice I was given was to "not let MIT get in the way of your education." Not sure what I wanted to do with my life, and not wanting to become an engineer, I left to pursue my own education. My path led me, over a period of many years, to working with many gifted and wonderful healers, in the process of finding myself and healing myself. I feel privileged to be able to 'pass the Gift on,' to others. I consider myself a facilitator for emotional and spiritual healing. While I use specific methods and modalities such as EFT, NLP, EMDR, Hypnotherapy and Mindfulness Meditation, I believe that true healing arises from Within, even when seemingly facilitated by someone or something external.

I seek to help people emerge, to assist them in freeing themselves from the bonds of mental, familial and societal conditioning, so that they can live freer, happier, more authentic lives. We all wish to be free of suffering; and we all wish to be happy. My name is my purpose.

I am privileged to be a member of ACEP, the Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology, a non-profit organization which is educating, researching and promoting energy-based methods for alleviating suffering, enhancing performance and raising human awareness. I have served as chairman of ACEP's research committee for the past seven years, which has given me the opportunity to dialogue and collaborate with some of the finest minds in the field.
Taken from: http://www.johnfreedom.com/about.php" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

More on him:
I consider myself to be spiritually oriented. I am both Christian and Buddhist, conservative and progressive in my viewpoints. I am a long-time student of Vipassana (mindfulness) and Vajrayana (Tibetan) Buddhism, Advaita Vedanta, and A Course In Miracles. I enjoy meditation, and practice yoga and qi gong, (mostly!) every day.
Taken from: http://www.johnfreedom.com/about.php" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Fred Gallo, PhD, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center:
Welcome to my Energy Psychology® website!
Taken from: http://energypsych.com/contact/about-dr ... allo-ph-d/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

More here:
Since its inception, I have been an advisory board member of the Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology (ACEP).

Since 1993, I have written and presented extensively on Energy Psychology. Besides numerous manuals, journal articles and book chapters, I’ve published 8 books. The field of Energy Psychology was named and introduced in my 1998 book, Energy Psychology. Next followed Energy Diagnostic and Treatment Methods in 2000; The Neurophysics of Human Behavior (Furman & Gallo 2000); Energy Tapping (Gallo & Vincenzi 2000, 2008); and an edited volume, Energy Psychology in Psychotherapy in 2002 (focusing on the spectrum of energy psychology approaches with chapters by major contributors to the field). My sixth book is the 2005 second edition of Energy Psychology, a revision with expanded chapters and extensive information on energy psychology research, treatment approaches, and resources. The seventh book is Energy Tapping for Trauma (2007). And the eighth is the second expanded edition of Energy Tapping in 2008. I’ve also published numerous manuals on energy psychology, Energy Diagnostic and Treatment Methods (EDxTM™), and Energy Consciousness Therapy (ECT™) in English, German, Polish, Italian, Finnish, Spanish, and Swedish. So far several of my books have been translated into German and Spanish. I also published an audiotape and CD on the Healing Energy Light Process (HELP™) and a DVD covering several techniques from Energy Tapping for Trauma. You can read about these books, manuals, and the audiotape in other sections of this site. I’m also pleased that many of my students in the USA and Europe have published successful books on Energy Psychology.
Taken from: http://energypsych.com/contact/about-dr ... allo-ph-d/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

More here:
Since 1993, I have been providing training internationally in Energy Psychology and have developed a multi-faceted approach, Energy Diagnostic and Treatment Methods (EDxTM)™, in which I have been offering certification internationally since 1997. Since that time thousands of professionals have been trained in Advanced Energy Psychology/ EDxTM and many are now offering training in this approach. (See sections on Energy Psychology/ EDxTM seminars and Certified Practitioners for details.)

Several years ago I developed Energy Consciousness Therapy (ECT)™, which integrates principles of energy, thought, consciousness, and spirituality into a therapeutic-communication methodology. ECT emphasizes the elevation or expansion of consciousness and thus understanding with regard to specific problem areas to promote lasting and generative change. In simple terms, ECT is a method of helping you to disconnect from a specific problem by experientially witnessing its essential structure and accessing innate mental health. This approach also emphasizes the importance of common sense and the therapist’s mental health and intuition in the therapeutic encounter.

Recently I have been developing the Identity Method (IM)™, which involves focused mindfulness to treat and transcend psychological problems, including global ego states or controlling identities. This method draws on the work of Tsultrim Allione, David Bohm, Pema Chödrön, Milton Erickson, Werner Erhard, Eugene T. Gendlin, Machig Labdrön, John Mace, Fritz Perls, Eckert Tolle, and Stephen Wolinsky. (No doubt there have been other formative influences as well.) In addition to meditative processes and techniques to instill presence and quiet the mind, IM involves placing attention on specific sensory representations of a problem (focused mindfulness) in order to transmute its energy and actualize positive outcomes.
Taken from: http://energypsych.com/contact/about-dr ... allo-ph-d/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Robert Hoss, Dreamscience Foundation, sou medicine where he worked with Dawson Church wow:
Robert Hoss, MS is author of Dream Language, Officer and former President of the International Association for the Study of Dreams, Director of the DreamScience foundation for research grants, advisory board of the Soul Medicine Institute and Haden Institute faculty member. A frequent guest on radio and TV, he was host of the IASD DreamTime Radio series and has been an internationally acclaimed lecturer and/or instructor on dreams and dreamwork at various institutions, colleges and universities for over 30 years. His simple but powerful Image Activation dreamworking approach is based on a unique blending of Gestalt work, Jungian theory, the neurobiology of dreaming, plus his research into the significance of color in dreams. Formerly a scientist, and researcher in the field of optical communications, he was a pioneer with multiple patents and the Corporate Vice President for Global Telecommunications at both American Express and IBM. He now devotes his science and management skills to dream studies.
Taken from: http://dreamscience.org/idx_about.htm" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Soul Medicine Institute:
Soul Medicine Institute

I founded the non-profit Soul Medicine Institute in order to further scientific research into healing that results from changes in consciousness. Soul Medicine Institute is at the forefront of research in Energy Medicine and Energy Psychology, with the design of several studies measuring the effects of these techniques on emotional and physical trauma.
Taken from: http://www.dawsonchurch.com/soulmedinst.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Dorothea Hover-Kramer, EdD, RN, Behavioral Health Consultants:

She works with Noetic sciences:
Biography

DOROTHEA HOVER-KRAMER, EDD, RN, CNS, cofounder and past president of ACEP, most recently coauthored with Midge Murphy, JD, PhD, Creating Right Relationships: A Practical Guide to Ethics in Energy Therapies.
Taken from: http://www.noetic.org/directory/person/ ... er-kramer/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Meg Jordan, PhD, RN, California Institute of Integral Studies. Again integrative medicine:
Professor Meg Jordan, PhD, RN, CWP, is Department Chair of Integrative Health Studies and Somatic Psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco, where her focus is preparing graduate students as catalysts for positive change in health care, wellness and health promotion. Dr. Jordan is a clinical medical anthropologist, an award-winning international health journalist, behavioral medicine specialist, RN, author, and President of Global Medicine Enterprises, Inc.
Taken from: http://www.ciis.edu/Academics/Graduate_ ... ordan.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Stanley Krippner, PhD, Saybrook University:
Krippner's dream telepathy experiments have not been independently replicated.[6][7][8][9] James Alcock has written the dream telepathy experiments of Krippner at Maimonides have failed to provide evidence for telepathy and "lack of replication is rampant."[10]

The picture target experiments that were conducted by Krippner and Ullman, were criticized by C. E. M. Hansel. According to Hansel there were weaknesses in the design of the experiments in the way in which the agent became aware of their target picture. Only the agent should have known the target and no other person until the judging of targets had been completed, however, an experimenter was with the agent when the target envelope was opened. Hansel also wrote there had been poor controls in the experiment as the main experimenter could communicate with the subject.[11]

An attempt to replicate the experiments that used picture targets was carried out by Edward Belvedere and David Foulkes. The finding was that neither the subject nor the judges matched the targets with dreams above chance level.[12] Results from other experiments by Belvedere and Foulkes were also negative.[13]

Krippner has contributed to and edited Future Science: Life Energies and the Physics of Paranormal Phenomena (1977). The book included an essay from the parapsychologist Julius Weinberger, who claimed to have communicated with the dead by using a Venus flytrap as the medium. Paul Kurtz criticized the book for endorsing pseudoscience.[14]
Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Krippner#Reception" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Eric Leskowitz, MD, Harvard Medical School is also for woo:
Certifications:
American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
American Board of Holistic Medicine

Dr. Leskowitz has a longstanding interest in various integrative medicine therapies, in particular meditation, energy healing and the role of consciousness in creating health. He also has an interest in the mechanism of action of so-called subtle energy treatments such as Therapeutic Touch and Reiki. He has also published in many scientific and lay publications, presented his work nationally and internationally, and has edited two books on complementary and alternative medicine.
Taken from: http://pmr.hms.harvard.edu/pages/45/168/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Fred Luskin, PhD, Stanford University a transpersonal psychology person:
Fred Luskin

Dr. Fred Luskin has completed extensive research on the training and measurement of forgiveness therapy. His research demonstrates that learning forgiveness leads to increased physical vitality, hope, greater self–efficacy, enhanced optimism and conflict resolution skills. It also shows that forgiveness lessons the physical and emotional toll of stress, and decreases hurt, anger depression and blood pressure.

He has worked with men and women from both sides of the violence in Northern Ireland who have had family members killed and with different groups of financial advisors after the stock market crash of 2000 to enhance their conflict resolution and stress management skills.

Dr. Luskin is the author of the best seller Forgive for Good: A Proven Prescription for Health and Happiness and Stress Free for Good. He has worked with many organizations and has trained lawyers, doctors, church leaders and congregations, hospital staffs, teachers and other professionals to manage stress and enhance forgiveness all over the United States. Dr. Luskin’s work has been featured in Time magazine, O magazine, Ladies Home Journal, U.S. News and World Reports, Parade, Prevention as well as the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, U.S.A. Today and the Wall Street Journal.

Frederic Luskin, Ph.D. is the Director of the Stanford University Forgiveness Projects and an Associate Professor at the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology. He also serves as the Co Chair of the Garden of Forgiveness Project at Ground Zero in Manhattan.
Taken from: http://www.thepowerofforgiveness.com/ab ... uskin.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Transpersonal psychology:
Criticism towards the field of Transpersonal Psychology has been raised by a wide assortment of commentators, and includes both writers from within its own ranks, as well as writers representing other fields of psychology or philosophy. One of the earliest criticisms of the field was issued by the Humanistic psychologist Rollo May, who disputed the conceptual foundations of Transpersonal psychology.[8] According to commentators[3] May also criticized the field for neglecting the personal dimension of the psyche by elevating the pursuit of the transcendental. Commentators[3] note that these reservations, expressed by May, might reflect what later theorists have referred to as “spiritual bypassing”.

Later criticism includes the observations of philosopher Ken Wilber, one of the early profiles within the Transpersonal field, who has repeatedly announced the demise of Transpersonal psychology.[88][89] Wilber has distanced himself from the transpersonal field in favour of a new model that he calls Integral.[3][24]

Skepticism towards the concept of spiritual emergencies, and the transpersonal dimension in psychiatry, has been expressed by Gray.[90]
Failure to meet scientific criteria[edit]

The field of Transpersonal psychology has also been criticized for lacking conceptual, evidentiary, and scientific rigor. In a review of criticisms of the field, Cunningham writes, "philosophers have criticized transpersonal psychology because its metaphysics is naive and epistemology is undeveloped. Multiplicity of definitions and lack of operationalization of many of its concepts has led to a conceptual confusion about the nature of transpersonal psychology itself (i.e., the concept is used differently by different theorists and means different things to different people). Biologists have criticized transpersonal psychology for its lack of attention to biological foundations of behavior and experience. Physicists have criticized transpersonal psychology for inappropriately accommodating physic concepts as explanations of consciousness."[91]

Others, such as Friedman,[39] have criticized the field for being underdeveloped as a field of science, placing it at the intersection between a broader domain of transpersonal inquiry, which includes some unscientific approaches, and the scientific discipline of psychology. Transpersonal psychology has been criticized for undervaluing quantitative methods as a tool for improving our knowledge of spiritual and transpersonal categories. This is, according to commentators,[9] a consequence of a general orientation within the field that regards spiritual and transpersonal experience to be categories that defy conceptualization and quantification, and thereby not well suited for conventional scientific inquiry.

Albert Ellis, a cognitive psychologist and humanist, has questioned the results of transpersonal psychotherapy,[92] the scientific status of transpersonal psychology, and its relationship to religion, mysticism and authoritarian belief systems.[93][94] Both Wilber [95] and Walsh [96] have replied to this criticism. However, Ellis (2000) later modified his understanding of religious/spiritual/transpersonal experiences, and has recently even seen some value in exploring, rather than merely debunking, these experiences in psychotherapy.[97]

Other commentators, such as Matthews,[69] are more supportive of the field, but remarks that a weakness of Transpersonal psychology, and psychotherapy, has been its reliance on anecdotal clinical experiences rather than research.
Ontology and philosophical worldview[edit]

Ferrer[64] has criticized transpersonal psychology for being too loyal to the perennial philosophy, for introducing a subtle Cartesianism, and for being too preoccupied with intrasubjective spiritual states (inner empiricism). As an alternative to these trends he suggests a revision of transpersonal theory. That is, a participatory vision of human spirituality that honors a wide assortment of spiritual insights, spiritual worlds and places. According to Davis [6] Transpersonal psychology has been criticized for emphasizing oneness and holism at the expense of diversity.

Gary T. Alexander has criticized the relationship between transpersonal psychology and the ideas of William James. Although the ideas of James are considered central to the transpersonal field, Alexander[98] thought that transpersonal psychology did not have a clear understanding of the negative dimensions of consciousness (such as evil) expressed in James' philosophy. This serious criticism has been absorbed by later transpersonal theory, which has been more willing to reflect on these important dimensions of human existence.[99]
Use of Buddhist concepts[edit]

From the standpoint of Buddhism and Dzogchen, Elías Capriles [100] [101][102] has objected that transpersonal psychology fails to distinguish between the transpersonal condition of nirvana, which is inherently liberating, those transpersonal conditions which are within samsara and which as such are new forms of bondage (such as the four realms of the arupyadhatu or four arupa lokas of Buddhism, in which the figure-ground division dissolves but there is still a subject-object duality), and the neutral condition in which neither nirvana nor samsara are active that the Dzogchen teachings call kun gzhi, in which there is no subject-object duality but the true condition of all phenomena (dharmata) is not patent (and which includes all conditions involving nirodh or cessation, including nirodh samapatti, nirvikalpa samadhis and the samadhi or turiya that is the supreme realization of Patañjali's Yoga darshana). In the process of elaborating what he calls a meta-transpersonal psychology, Capriles has carried out conscientious refutations of Wilber, Grof and Washburn, which according to Macdonald & Friedman [103] will have important repercussions on the future of transpersonal psychology.
Relationship to religion and New Age movements[edit]

According to Cunningham, transpersonal psychology has been criticized by some Christian authors as being "a mishmash of 'New Age' ideas that offer an alternative faith system to vulnerable youths who turn their backs on organized religion (Adeney, 1988)."[91] Commentators also mention that Transpersonal Psychology's association with the ideas of religion was one of the concerns that prohibited it from becoming a separate division of the American Psychological Association at the time of the petition in 1984.[8]
Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transperso ... ical_views" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Philip Mollon, MD, Lister Hospital. He is a strong believer. One of his works:
Thought Field Therapy and its Derivatives: Rapid Relief of Mental Health Problems through Tapping on the Body

Phil Mollon, MD, Lister Hospital

Primary Care and Community Psychiatry. (2007, December), 12[3-4], 123-127.
Taken from: http://www.eftuniverse.com/index.php?op ... le&id=2454" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Here is James Oschman, PhD, Nature’s Own Research Association. I am just quoting the woo. It is not the full text:
JAMES L. OSCHMAN, Ph.D.

President, Nature’s Own Research Association

Ph.D. Biological Sciences, University of Pittsburgh, 1965

B.S. Biophysics, University of Pittsburgh, 1961

e-mail: joschman@aol.com


RESEARCH

Academic research (1965-1980) involved the structure and function of cells and tissues, with particular reference to fluid and ion transport and the role of calcium in control of cell functions. Subsequent research (1981-present) involves explorations of the scientific basis for complementary and alternative medicines.

Modern research science is validating and explaining the beneficial effects of a wide range of complementary, alternative and integrative therapies. Jim's writings synthesize the science and the experience of a variety of bodywork, energetic, and movement therapies. You will find samples of Jim's writings on this web site.

Every medical tradition and every therapeutic school has a core of visionary and creative individuals who are advancing the methodology and who recognize that their work of innovation, like that of their predecessors, is never finished. Jim’s books, articles, lectures and workshops are offered in support of these visionaries and their creative process.

Recently Jim has also become involved as a consultant in the design of medical devices, relying on his experience in biophysics and complementary medicine.
Taken from: http://energyresearch.homestead.com/about.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

More here:
AWARDS AND DISTINCTIONS

Founder’s Award, National Foundation for Alternative Medicine (NFAM), 2002.
Taken from: http://energyresearch.homestead.com/about.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Norman Shealy, MD, PhD, Holos Institutes of Health. Holos is a woo heaven who wants donations a lot:
Ecopsychology

Ecopsychology best describes the philosophical framework of Holos Institute. It is an approach toward healing in which the human mind and body are viewed in their relationship to nature and the whole web of life. Ecopsychology offers a philosophical ground for deeper understanding of human problems and practical approaches for healing and transformation. There is reciprocity between the natural processes of our world and the balanced psyche. In nature we find metaphors and direct experiences that can restore well being. Psychologically healthy people have a respectful and sustainable relationship with the natural world.

The name “Holos” is derived from the Greek term for wholeness. Holos Institute re-envisions the therapeutic process to include mind, body and spirit as well as the living community of which we are all a part. We honor the diverse human cultural heritage of our ancestors and that which we know as the natural world: the plants, animals and living Earth upon which we all depend. We seek to integrate practices of ancient and contemporary therapeutic arts, attuning to the uniqueness of each individual, as we help them navigate towards wholeness and creativity in fulfilling their life purpose.

Our vision is to integrate the wisdom of an ecologically based psychology into clinical practices that serve to restore balance to the mind, body and spirit, and generate kindness toward the greater community in which we live.
Taken from: http://holosinstitute.net/ecopsychology/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

More info here:
A non-profit ecopsychology counseling and education center

Holos Institute is a non-profit, community counseling center and training institute providing services throughout the greater San Francisco Bay area.

We offer a range of affordable, highly skilled, professional counseling services to the community. Our offices are based in:

San Francisco at 310 Third Avenue (near Clement Street)
Oakland at 5463 College Avenue (in Rockridge)
With satellite offices in Marin (San Anselmo)

Our psychotherapy services are available with advanced marriage and family therapist interns in our training program. We also offer unique group experiences in nature/wilderness. Our work is holistically oriented and grounded in principles of ecopsychology. In addition to psychotherapy services, Holos serves as a public and professional forum for topics in ecopsychology, holistic, and integrative psychology through ongoing lectures, workshops, and experiential programs.

We serve adults, couples, groups and families at fees adjusted to client need, ranging from $35 to $95, based on ability to pay.

Holos Institute is a non-profit (5013c) organization that depends upon generous donations to support our education program, development, offer free and low cost groups, and supplement low-fee services. Please consider donating to us. Your donation, of any amount, is greatly appreciated and is fully tax deductible. Thank you!
Taken from: http://holosinstitute.net/a-non-profit- ... on-center/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Charles Tart, PhD, University of California at Davis:
OBE experiment[edit]

In 1968, Tart conducted an OBE experiment with a subject known as Miss Z for four nights in his sleep laboratory.[3] The subject was attached to an EEG machine and a five-digit code was placed on a shelf above her bed. She did not claim to see the number on the first three nights but on fourth gave the number correctly.[4][5]

During the experiment Tart monitored the equipment in the next room, behind an observation window, however, he admitted he had occasionally dozed during the night.[6] The psychologists Leonard Zusne and Warren Jones have written that the possibility of the subject having obtained the number through ordinary sensory means was not ruled out during the experiment. For example when light fell on the code it was reflected from the surface of a clock located on the wall above the shelf. The subject was not constantly observed and it was also suggested she may have read the number when she was being attached to the EEG machine.[4] According to the magician Milbourne Christopher "If she had held a mirror with a handle in her right hand, by tilting the mirror and looking up she could have seen a reflection of the paper on the shelf... The woman had not been searched prior to the experiment, nor had an observer been in the sleep chamber with her — precautions that should have been taken."[6]

The psychologist James Alcock criticized the experiment for inadequate controls and questioned why the subject was not visually monitored by a video camera.[7] Martin Gardner has written the experiment was not evidence for an OBE and suggested that whilst Tart was "snoring behind the window, Miss Z simply stood up in bed, without detaching the electrodes, and peeked."[8] Susan Blackmore wrote "If Miss Z had tried to climb up, the brain-wave record would have showed a pattern of interference. And that was exactly what it did show."[9]

The experiment was not repeated at the laboratory, Tart wrote this was because Miss Z moved from the area where the laboratory was located.[10]
Reception[edit]

Tart has drawn criticism from the scientific community for his comments on a failed psychokinesis (PK) experiment. The targets from the random number generator that were used in the experiment were not random. Tart responded by claiming the nonrandomness was due to a PK effect. Terence Hines has written a procedural flaw in the experiment itself was used by Tart as evidence for psi and this is an example of the use of a nonfalsifiable hypothesis in parapsychology.[11]

In 1980, Tart claimed that a rejudging of the transcripts from one of Russell Targ and Harold Puthoff’s remote viewing experiments revealed an above-chance result.[12] Targ and Puthoff refused to provide copies of the transcripts and it was not until July 1985 that they were made available for study when it was discovered they still contained sensory cues.[13] The psychologist David Marks and Christopher Scott (1986) wrote "considering the importance for the remote viewing hypothesis of adequate cue removal, Tart’s failure to perform this basic task seems beyond comprehension. As previously concluded, remote viewing has not been demonstrated in the experiments conducted by Puthoff and Targ, only the repeated failure of the investigators to remove sensory cues."[14] Tart has also been criticized by the skeptic Robert Todd Carroll for ignoring Occam's razor (advocating the paranormal instead of naturalistic explanations) and for ignoring the known laws of physics.[15]

Tart's book about marijuana On Being Stoned has received mixed reviews.[16][17] Harris Chaiklin wrote the book rejected medical evidence and laboratory experiments in favor for the opinions of marijuana users and probability statistics were inappropriately used.[17] In his book Learning to Use Extrasensory Perception, Targ endorsed experimental methods from learning theory and the results from card guessing experiments in support for ESP. Richard Land wrote that Tart's data was unconvincing but concluded "the book will be enjoyed by believers in ESP, and sceptics will regard it as a curiosity".[18]

In 1981, Tart received the James Randi Educational Foundation Media Pigasus Award "for discovering that the further in the future events are, the more difficult it is to predict them."[19]
Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Tart" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

There is even a rationalwiki entry about Tart.

Berney Williams, PhD, Energy Medicine University. He even works for woo, Holos University:
Berney Williams, Ph.D. is President of the Center for Environmental Energy Medicine Studies in Lawrence, Kansas and Associate Professor in the Energy Medicine/Spiritual Healing program of the Holos University Graduate Seminary (HUGS), Fairview, Missouri. His is also serving as the Director of Development for the College of Integrative Medicine, based in Eudora and Lawrence, Kansas, where the first school under development is a Naturopathic medical school.

Dr. Williams is also serving as the Dean of Graduate Studies with the Energy Medicine University, being established as the distance learning wing of the Academy of Intuition Medicine, in Sausalitio, California. In his activities in these graduate faculties, he has chaired a wide range of doctoral and masters degree research projects in energy medicine and spiritual healing.

I am not a healing practitioner. I am an academic, spending most of my time working with healing practioners, helping them design research on their own modalities. In this activity, I study a wide gamut of healing processes. My life role is to aid communication between knowledge groups, whether across cultures or across specialist communities in the same culture. As I mature, I become more and more aware of my use of intuition and clairsentience in these social translation activities, but I am not a master of such processes, they seem more to be my masters.
Taken from: http://councilforhealing.org/Education.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

I could go on and on but I think this shows the point. Even Jimmy Wales the founder the wikipedia showed his dislike of this stuff:
The Association for Comprehensive Energy Psychology (ACEP) set up a Change.org petition asking Wikipedia to make it easier to post crazy pseudo-science to Wikipedia, specifically information about "Energy Medicine, Energy Psychology, and specific approaches such as the Emotional Freedom Techniques, Thought Field Therapy, and the Tapas Acupressure Technique."

In response, Wikipedia co-founder Jimmy Wales said "no," very emphatically. He told the petitioners that Wikipedia would continue to accept material published in peer-reviewed scientific journals, but would not "pretend that the work of lunatic charlatans is the equivalent of 'true scientific discourse.' It isn't."
Taken from: http://boingboing.net/2014/03/26/jimmy- ... y-wor.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

The same in more detail can be found here: http://whyevolutionistrue.wordpress.com ... iated-woo/" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

However all this is actually energy medicine and in the end it points down to this that most of it is really woo:
Energy medicine, energy therapy, energy healing, or spiritual healing is a branch of complementary and alternative medicine, holds the belief that a healer can channel healing energy into the person seeking help by different methods: hands-on,[1] hands-off,[1] and distant[1][2] (or absent) where the patient and healer are in different locations. There are various schools of energy healing. It is known as biofield energy healing,[3][4] spiritual healing,[5] contact healing, distant healing, therapeutic touch,[6] Reiki[7] or Qigong.[3] Spiritual healing is largely non-denominational: practitioners do not see traditional religious faith as a prerequiste for effecting a cure. Faith healing, by contrast, takes place within a religious context.[8][verification needed]

Early reviews of the scientific literature on energy healing were equivocal and recommended further research,[9][10] but more recent reviews have concluded that there is no evidence supporting clinical efficacy.[11][12][13][14][15][16] The theoretical basis of healing has been criticised,[17][18][19][20] research and reviews supportive of energy medicine have been criticised for containing methodological flaws[21][22][23] and selection bias[21][22] and positive therapeutic results have been dismissed as the result of known psychological mechanisms.[21][22]

Edzard Ernst, lately Professor of Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the University of Exeter, has warned that "healing continues to be promoted despite the absence of biological plausibility or convincing clinical evidence ... that these methods work therapeutically and plenty to demonstrate that they do not."[13] Some claims of those purveying "energy medicine" devices are known to be fraudulent[24] and their marketing practices have drawn law-enforcement action in the U.S.[24]
Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_medicine" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Here is the work of Ernst who is a CSI fellow:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edzard_Ernst" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

Conclusion: A lot of those people in the journal are woo believers and are already convinced that their work is valid. Also many of their work was published in woo journals and many of those people have been criticized for flaws. So I have nothing more to say here.
"Death Dies Hard." - Deathstars.

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Shen1986
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Re: EFT peer review articles..

Post by Shen1986 » Tue Aug 12, 2014 9:04 am

Even Oschman publishes in Explore:
Oschman, J.L. and J. Spencer, with David Minkoff, 2004. Best cases in biological medicine. Explore! 13(6). ABSTRACT FULL TEXT

Oschman, J.L., 2008. Energy medicine and longevity. Explore! Magazine 17(5):1-6. FULL TEXT
Taken from: http://energyresearch.homestead.com/about.html" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;
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Re: EFT peer review articles..

Post by kennyc » Tue Aug 12, 2014 11:15 am

Thanks Shen!
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Re: EFT peer review articles..

Post by Gord » Tue Aug 12, 2014 12:41 pm

I had no idea -- NONE! -- that our posts could be that long.
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"Imagine an ennobling of what could be" -- the New Age BS Generator site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
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Re: EFT peer review articles..

Post by kennyc » Tue Aug 12, 2014 12:48 pm

Gord wrote:I had no idea -- NONE! -- that our posts could be that long.
Me either, but now you do, Skeptic Forum is the new arm of Amazon Publishing!
:lol:

Just take your middle fingers and tap alternately on your temples for a count of 47, repeat three times a day.
Kenny A. Chaffin
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Re: EFT peer review articles..

Post by Gord » Tue Aug 12, 2014 12:54 pm

kennyc wrote:
Gord wrote:I had no idea -- NONE! -- that our posts could be that long.
Me either, but now you do, Skeptic Forum is the new arm of Amazon Publishing!
:lol:

Just take your middle fingers and tap alternately on your temples for a count of 47, repeat three times a day.
I can't do that, the secret moon base will think I've begun encoding my telepathic communications again!

Seriously, you just don't think these things through, do you. :beee:
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"Imagine an ennobling of what could be" -- the New Age BS Generator site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
#ANDAMOVIE
Is Trump in jail yet?

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Re: EFT peer review articles..

Post by kennyc » Tue Aug 12, 2014 2:33 pm

Gord wrote:
kennyc wrote:
Gord wrote:I had no idea -- NONE! -- that our posts could be that long.
Me either, but now you do, Skeptic Forum is the new arm of Amazon Publishing!
:lol:

Just take your middle fingers and tap alternately on your temples for a count of 47, repeat three times a day.
I can't do that, the secret moon base will think I've begun encoding my telepathic communications again!

Seriously, you just don't think these things through, do you. :beee:
and there's the Stellar Metamorphosis too, forgot about that.....
Kenny A. Chaffin
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Re: EFT peer review articles..

Post by Shen1986 » Tue Aug 12, 2014 5:57 pm

Gord wrote:I had no idea -- NONE! -- that our posts could be that long.
You see you learn a new thing every day..

:lol:

Seriously I should get a blog.. :lol:
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Re: EFT peer review articles..

Post by kennyc » Tue Aug 12, 2014 7:36 pm

Shen1986 wrote:
Gord wrote:I had no idea -- NONE! -- that our posts could be that long.
You see you learn a new thing every day..

:lol:

Seriously I should get a blog.. :lol:
You should! I use Blogspot, but it is associated with Google something you might or might not want. There are many choices...
Kenny A. Chaffin
Art Gallery - Photo Gallery - Writing&Poetry - The Bleeding Edge
"Strive on with Awareness" - Siddhartha Gautama