The Man Who Loved Mesons....

Read any good books lately?
nmblum88
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The Man Who Loved Mesons....

Post by nmblum88 » Thu May 30, 2013 7:11 pm

.... among many other things...
Which is what made J. Robert Oppenheimer unique in the world, and not merely in the rarified community of serious scientists who came to the world's attention on the seminal morning in August of 1945.
I just closed the cover of Ray Monk's very recent effort,, "Robert Oppenheimer: A Life Inside the Center" a valiant effort to make comprehensible the complex, haughty, imperious, vulnerable and ultimately pitiable Oppenheimer.
An interesting read, (although not as winning and/or accessible) as the "American Prometheus" of a few years ago....
The best (and most tiring thing) about this biography is that the author was less co-opted by Oppenheimer's personal radiance as a man, scholar, scientist and lover (Oppenheimer has the distinction of being of more prurient interest than any scientist in history), and more interest in the love story with science, the poetry of Physics, that led Oppenheimer from being an admired Professor, poet, horseman, interpreter of the Bhagavad Gita, to Los Alamos, to the seminal explosion in the desert, to the (open and then closed with finality) bomb bay of the Enola Gay, to Hiroshima and.... sadly.... to the debacle with the A.E.C. the U.S. Congress, AND his fellow scientists (most damnably with Edward Teller) that ultimately stripped him of his glory AND even his security clearance...
Oppenheimer, according to Monk, REALLY loved his mesons......
More than anything, fame, fortune, books, women.....
But in the end, Oppenheimer's story is as basic as any tale of privilege, fame and love laid low by hubris, for sure, but certainly by the jealousy, professional an personal of a heroic figure out of Homer.

NMB
Skepticism:
" Norma, you poor sad lonely alcoholic. You entire life is devoted to interrupting other people's posts on this forum, regardless of the topic, to tell them what's wrong with them. The irony is, here you are doing it again, with this very post.
Your fanciful card games, movie sojourns and exciting overseas trips, that all take place within the four walls of an aged care retirement home, do not suggest your own children offered you the care, I gave my parents."