World Without End

Read any good books lately?
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Lausten
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World Without End

Post by Lausten » Mon Mar 11, 2013 4:30 pm

I've been reading again. I know, dangerous. You'll need a lot of time, but I highly recommend Ken Follet's World Without End. It is the follow-up to Pillars of the Earth, but you can read them in any order, they don't depend on each other.

WWE takes place after the Condemnations of 1277 were lifted and covers the time of the Black Plague. So it deals a lot with the new idea of applying reason, the issues of worker's rights, power struggles of the clergy and kings and primarily, women's rights. He's not historically accurate, but I think he does a great job of guessing what it must have been like for a woman who knew that leeches and bleedings were not cures, but had to deal with being accused of being a witch if she suggested using herbal medicines. The scheming of the men in power gets pretty ugly and just about every sexual perversion and orientation is covered in detail. A few characters manage to eek out happy lives, but definitely not a Hollywood ending to this one.
A sermon helper that doesn't tell you what to believe: http://www.milepost100.com

nmblum88
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Re: World Without End

Post by nmblum88 » Mon Mar 11, 2013 5:01 pm

Lausten wrote:I've been reading again. I know, dangerous. You'll need a lot of time, but I highly recommend Ken Follet's World Without End. It is the follow-up to Pillars of the Earth, but you can read them in any order, they don't depend on each other.

WWE takes place after the Condemnations of 1277 were lifted and covers the time of the Black Plague. So it deals a lot with the new idea of applying reason, the issues of worker's rights, power struggles of the clergy and kings and primarily, women's rights. He's not historically accurate, but I think he does a great job of guessing what it must have been like for a woman who knew that leeches and bleedings were not cures, but had to deal with being accused of being a witch if she suggested using herbal medicines. The scheming of the men in power gets pretty ugly and just about every sexual perversion and orientation is covered in detail. A few characters manage to eek out happy lives, but definitely not a Hollywood ending to this one.
Never read either book, but the review brings to mind a film a saw last week-end that touches on similar themes.
."Beyond the Hills" is a contemporary fiction on the consequences of prevalent religious superstition on a community in the gloomy setting of East Central Europe.
The implications being that we have managed to cure plagues, but we haven't for whatever reason been able to eradicate religiously encouraged credulity in the power of god's intervention in our human redemption from so-called sin.
"Sin," being whatever man, in his time, deems sin to be.
Should be seen... but it's been four days, and I'm still living under the pall of melancholia induced by the madness religion has the power to inflict, particularly on the isolated and defenseless against predatory clergy.

NMB
Skepticism:
" Norma, you poor sad lonely alcoholic. You entire life is devoted to interrupting other people's posts on this forum, regardless of the topic, to tell them what's wrong with them. The irony is, here you are doing it again, with this very post.
Your fanciful card games, movie sojourns and exciting overseas trips, that all take place within the four walls of an aged care retirement home, do not suggest your own children offered you the care, I gave my parents."