Brain sludge from my misspent youth: A French sentence

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Upton_O_Goode
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Brain sludge from my misspent youth: A French sentence

Post by Upton_O_Goode » Sat Nov 17, 2018 1:14 pm

I must be getting near the end. I woke up this morning with this French sentence, which I read at least 60 years ago, prominent in my head. It's a remarkable instance of the enormous number of homonyms in the French language (les, lait, laid...), but it is at least an actual sentence telling the listener/reader that a man named Gal, who was the queen's lover, went gallantly from Aregne to the Big Tower at Nimes, thereby completing a high-minded journey. You have to read it aloud with the proper French pronunciation to see how unusual it is. I forget who is credited with composing it originally.

Gallement de l’Aregne à la Tour Magne à Nîmes
Gal, amant de la reine, alla—tour magnanime.
“It is certainly sad and regrettable that so many innocent people died…Stalin was absolutely adamant on making doubly sure: spare no one…I don’t deny that I supported that view. I was simply not able to study every individual case…It was hard to draw a precise line where to stop.”

Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Skryabin (“Molotov”)

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Re: Brain sludge from my misspent youth: A French sentence

Post by Gord » Sat Nov 17, 2018 8:21 pm

I believe it's called a holorhyme -- two sentences which sound alike but have different meanings.

Here's one:

L'un dit: Comment cela se mène?
Lundi commence la semaine.

Spoiler:
He says: How does that come about?
Monday starts the week.
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"Imagine an ennobling of what could be" -- the New Age BS Generator site
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Re: Brain sludge from my misspent youth: A French sentence

Post by Gord » Sat Nov 17, 2018 8:24 pm

...apparently it's also spelt "holorime", which just seems wrong: http://www.languageisavirus.com/poetry- ... lorime.php
Gall, amant de la Reine, alla (tour magnanime)
Gallamant de l'Arène à la Tour Magne, à Nîmes.

Spoiler:
Gallus, the Queen's lover, went (a magnanimous gesture)
Gallantly from the Arena to the Great Tower, at Nîmes.
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"Imagine an ennobling of what could be" -- the New Age BS Generator site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
#ANDAMOVIE
Is Trump in jail yet?

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Re: Brain sludge from my misspent youth: A French sentence

Post by Upton_O_Goode » Sat Nov 17, 2018 10:01 pm

Gord wrote:
Sat Nov 17, 2018 8:21 pm
I believe it's called a holorhyme -- two sentences which sound alike but have different meanings.

Here's one:

L'un dit: Comment cela se mène?
Lundi commence la semaine.

Spoiler:
He says: How does that come about?
Monday starts the week.
Yeah, I think this is probably easier in French than in English because of the holorhymes. (New word to me. Thanks.) I suspect it must be trivially easy in Japanese, which has only about 25 phonemes altogether (English has 36), and when you consider that most kanji characters have both on (Chinese) and kun (Japanese) readings, so "suzukaze" (cool wind) can also be read as "ryo fu" (same kanji in both cases) or "hara kiri" (belly-cut) can also be read as "seppuku." But I don't know any specific examples in Japanese.
“It is certainly sad and regrettable that so many innocent people died…Stalin was absolutely adamant on making doubly sure: spare no one…I don’t deny that I supported that view. I was simply not able to study every individual case…It was hard to draw a precise line where to stop.”

Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Skryabin (“Molotov”)