What would it take to make school interesting?

Methods and means of supporting critical thinking in education
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billontherock
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What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by billontherock » Tue Jun 10, 2008 4:09 am

What changes in the way education is committed by the public school system are needed to help children want to learn.?

The way it is currently perpetrated the very bright and the fairly dim are left out of the process, and the average student is faced with mind numbing boredom.

Gotta be a better way.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by rrichar911 » Tue Jun 10, 2008 7:36 am

You don't have to make children want to learn. They are born wanting to learn. The question should be what should we do to stop killing that desire.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by billontherock » Wed Jun 11, 2008 3:24 pm

BRAVO!
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Wed Jun 11, 2008 8:43 pm

rrichar911 wrote:You don't have to make children want to learn. They are born wanting to learn. The question should be what should we do to stop killing that desire.

Children have a natural curiosity about things around them. When the most interesting things around them are mostly electronic entertainment or recreational chemicals, school is boring and gets neglected.

Commercial interests who know how to capitalize on the child's innate desire to make billions of dollars are not only robbing our childrens' time, but robbing them of valuable life experience as well.

If someone wants to call for a ban on inappropriate content in electronic entertainment for children, go ahead but be prepared to let the laughter begin.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by OlegTheBatty » Sun Jun 15, 2008 3:50 am

I always enjoyed school, and did not understand why so many others did not. But then, I was good in math, sciences and literature. I never wondered whether my interests and facilities might be related.

So, how might the schools make these subjects more interesting for those who do not have a flare for them? Whether one is interested or not, they are necessary for functioning in a thechnological society.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Sun Jun 15, 2008 3:40 pm

mater deum wrote:This is an interesting talk by Sir Ken Robinson.

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/66

He makes a great point about our hierarchy of education. Math and languages at the top, then the humanities, then the arts. And in 'arts' we have the serious ones like music ans maybe visual arts.

Kids are taught from square one (Grade one) that you are either 'smart' or 'dumb'. Not good in math? "You are not one of the smart kids here" is basically what you feel the system is tellling you about yourself.

Why couldn't a child focus on dance? Well, it's not a 'serious' subject and "You can't make money doing that. That's just a fluff subject."

It's too bad our system of educating the young fails so many.

You're probably right, but ballet won't get you very far in life unless you are incredibly lucky. A good plan B is essential unless you are sure your destiny is only a single path.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by kreider204 » Tue Nov 11, 2008 11:44 pm

You are assuming that one can "make" school interesting. Some students just aren't interested, and nothing anyone can do can change that.

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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by bigtim » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:09 am

kreider204 wrote:You are assuming that one can "make" school interesting. Some students just aren't interested, and nothing anyone can do can change that.


not entirely true

if your'e dealing wtih a 16 year old it's too late.

Boys and girls learn differently. School (in the US, public schools) are designed to teach the way girls learn. So elementrary school girls tend to be more successful. MIddile School / Jr High is when boys start getting the ability to learn differently; but by them many of them are already on the wrong path education wise.

Best way to to make school interesting? Parents need to be involved. Parents need to value the classes and the learning. Parents need to model the behavior they want their kid to emulate. Kid doesn't read? Well, when was the last time you read a book?
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by Chachacha » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:15 am

mater deum wrote:BTW, when his students are too noisy and are not focused on doing their work he threatens them with a country music tape.

Bad music motivates even the worst students to 'buckle down.' :lol:


Funny! My husband's daughter had a teacher who threated them with Simon & Garfunkel tapes, she said you couldn't believe how fast the kids quieted down!

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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by Chachacha » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:44 am

bigtim wrote:
kreider204 wrote:You are assuming that one can "make" school interesting. Some students just aren't interested, and nothing anyone can do can change that.


not entirely true

if your'e dealing wtih a 16 year old it's too late.

Boys and girls learn differently. School (in the US, public schools) are designed to teach the way girls learn. So elementrary school girls tend to be more successful. MIddile School / Jr High is when boys start getting the ability to learn differently; but by them many of them are already on the wrong path education wise.

Best way to to make school interesting? Parents need to be involved. Parents need to value the classes and the learning. Parents need to model the behavior they want their kid to emulate. Kid doesn't read? Well, when was the last time you read a book?


Schools are again experimenting with same-sex classes. I would prefer that they make them same-personality/disposition classes because the girl class was all quiet and the boy class was held outdoors and had relay races and all sorts of outdoor physical activities as part of the class, i.e., they would call out a mulitplication and the boys would have to run to the teacher with the correct answer, and run back, trying to beat the others. I think it's a great idea, but there are boys who would do better in a quiet, cooperative environment and there are girls who would learn better in a physical, competitive environment.

What makes class interesting? Music, enthusiastic teachers, teachers who relate the information to other events or everyday occurences. Having said that, I had one teacher who tried harder than any other teacher to incorporate all of the above into her classes and she was the worse teacher I ever had! Poor thing. Oh,yeah, she was tied with an ex-nun for worse teacher - but that's another story! Uh oh, and a few male teachers who were hired for the coaching abilities - not their teaching abilities, who sat behind their desks and read from the textbooks. A few teachers who were emotionally unfit to train dogs, nevermind children. Oh, don't get me started!

Different students respond to different teachers and different styles of teaching. It'd be great if we had the flexibility to allow matching of teaching and learning styles.

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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by Major Malfunction » Wed Nov 12, 2008 12:02 pm

bigtim wrote:
kreider204 wrote:You are assuming that one can "make" school interesting. Some students just aren't interested, and nothing anyone can do can change that.


not entirely true

Do you read the {!#%@} posted here? On teh internets? Or were you just born yesterday?

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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:54 pm

It's very simple. Remove the competing distractions and school will become more interesting. Huge industries are based on grabbing childrens' attention and compelling them to buy things they find interesting. Electronic media, electronic games, TV, junk food, music and drugs are tough competition for school to compete against.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by brauneyz » Wed Nov 12, 2008 5:02 pm

landrew wrote:It's very simple. Remove the competing distractions and school will become more interesting. Huge industries are based on grabbing childrens' attention and compelling them to buy things they find interesting. Electronic media, electronic games, TV, junk food, music and drugs are tough competition for school to compete against.

I just have to ask, Landrew, are you hoping parents wise up and do this, or are you advocating some outside entity get involved in the removal of these distractions?

Social commentary on bad parenting or suggestion for governmental censorship? Or maybe this is the ugly head of capitalism rearing itself again and businesses should not be allowed to sell items you find inappropriate and distasteful. :?
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Wed Nov 12, 2008 8:04 pm

brauneyz wrote:
landrew wrote:It's very simple. Remove the competing distractions and school will become more interesting. Huge industries are based on grabbing childrens' attention and compelling them to buy things they find interesting. Electronic media, electronic games, TV, junk food, music and drugs are tough competition for school to compete against.

I just have to ask, Landrew, are you hoping parents wise up and do this, or are you advocating some outside entity get involved in the removal of these distractions?

Social commentary on bad parenting or suggestion for governmental censorship? Or maybe this is the ugly head of capitalism rearing itself again and businesses should not be allowed to sell items you find inappropriate and distasteful. :?

I didn't advocate any specific action, but I answered the question in the title, identifying the cause of the problem as I see it, according to my opinions. Do you have any evidence to refute what I've said or do you just like to express your distaste for my opinions?
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by brauneyz » Thu Nov 13, 2008 12:39 am

Landrew, I don't believe opinions can be refuted, only facts. These are your opinions and you are entitled to them. While I have expressed some distaste for some of your opinions in the past, mostly I am just trying to draw you out. This is a problem for me when reading your posts - that you use too many generalizations and it is difficult to assess hidden meanings, if any are present.

With regards to this particular question of what would make school more interesting (a very subjective issue to begin with), I do not agree that removing junk food or video games would address that. Can I find literature to suggest that children who play video games and watch TV to excess correlates highly with any number of less desirable variables, like test scores or classroom behavior? Sure I can. But interesting to the student? Why do we even believe that today's student is less interested in learning than we were? Could we do a better job of educating our kids? Absolutely.

I find it a little trite to jump on the bandwagon of the big, bad modern world and how it's killing our children, our society, whatever. I call it the Grandpa Syndrome. Everyone insists life was better in Grandpa's day, regardless of when that era actually occurred.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Thu Nov 13, 2008 3:21 am

brauneyz wrote:
I find it a little trite to jump on the bandwagon of the big, bad modern world and how it's killing our children, our society, whatever. I call it the Grandpa Syndrome. Everyone insists life was better in Grandpa's day, regardless of when that era actually occurred.

It doesn't matter what ridiculous name you call it, or how trite you think it is, the idea is that if you take away the distractions, better learning might occur. I am not calling for doing anything; its every parent's right to raise stupid children.

My simple assertion is that there is competition between education and entertainment, and the entertainment often wins. If you don't like that opinion, its noted, but if you present some thinking of your own, instead of telling us all how much you dislike mine, it would be more interesting.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by brauneyz » Thu Nov 13, 2008 6:09 am

Well, Landrew, here we go again...

I do not dislike your opinion that video games and junk food makes school uninteresting, but I do disagree with it. As children, we had activities that competed with school, but that did not make school uninteresting. I was raised on real sugar Kool-Aid, Ring Dings and Gilligans Island, but I loved going to school every day and learning new things.

Perhaps you are trying to argue that these activities are hurting school performance or somehow interfering with the education process. Again, I disagree. It is the value one places on education, which comes down from the parents. I don't think my parents gave a hoot whether I found school interesting, but I sure knew they considered it important.

Let's talk about teachers for a second. My teachers taught me, they did not entertain me. Today's teachers are forced to employ many new tactics in the name of 'learning', probably much more exciting, yet I would argue that the level of teaching is substandard compared to my day, because the expectations are lower. They are expected to control behavior, which once was considered the responsibility of the parents. If the parents don't value the education, the presence or absence of these distractions matters little.

So, are you arguing interest, or efficacy? Both are possible in a world filled with Game Boys and Big Macs, though I personally would not choose an abundance of either one.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by Major Malfunction » Thu Nov 13, 2008 9:49 am

This?

The identity of the German teacher who was caught on camera stripping down to almost nothing in front of her 15-year-old students has been revealed.


There's them "Moving Pictures".
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Thu Nov 13, 2008 1:08 pm

Major Malfunction wrote:This?

The identity of the German teacher who was caught on camera stripping down to almost nothing in front of her 15-year-old students has been revealed.


There's them "Moving Pictures".
That's one way to make education more interesting.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Thu Nov 13, 2008 1:57 pm

brauneyz wrote:Well, Landrew, here we go again...

I do not dislike your opinion that video games and junk food makes school uninteresting, but I do disagree with it. As children, we had activities that competed with school, but that did not make school uninteresting. I was raised on real sugar Kool-Aid, Ring Dings and Gilligans Island, but I loved going to school every day and learning new things.

Perhaps you are trying to argue that these activities are hurting school performance or somehow interfering with the education process. Again, I disagree. It is the value one places on education, which comes down from the parents. I don't think my parents gave a hoot whether I found school interesting, but I sure knew they considered it important.

Let's talk about teachers for a second. My teachers taught me, they did not entertain me. Today's teachers are forced to employ many new tactics in the name of 'learning', probably much more exciting, yet I would argue that the level of teaching is substandard compared to my day, because the expectations are lower. They are expected to control behavior, which once was considered the responsibility of the parents. If the parents don't value the education, the presence or absence of these distractions matters little.

So, are you arguing interest, or efficacy? Both are possible in a world filled with Game Boys and Big Macs, though I personally would not choose an abundance of either one.

Isn't "not choosing an abundance" the same as restricting access to something? Or is it all based on choice? That's been tried many times before, giving kids a choice to do what they want, but I don't think the results were stellar.

I'm just talking about creating an atmosphere more conducive to learning. Electronic entertainment devices and drugs are banned in the classrooms for a reason, they do interfere with learning. A parent can restrict access at home without being charged with child abuse. I'm saying that the absence of distractions results in better learning. It's great if kids can learn the self-discipline to learn, but don't rely on that alone.

You claim to be refuting my assertion that entertainment out-competes education after I pressed you for it, but you are simply just saying its not. I see no clear refutation. Is it possible you could stick to the issue and refrain from complaining about how much you dislike my postings? I'm here to address the issues, not to please you.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by brauneyz » Thu Nov 13, 2008 4:34 pm

No, you are here simply to argue. I've asked you to clarify some responses but you appear only interested in twisting words. No thanks.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Thu Nov 13, 2008 5:46 pm

brauneyz wrote:No, you are here simply to argue. I've asked you to clarify some responses but you appear only interested in twisting words. No thanks.

Can you give some specific examples instead of all these general claims about my postings? I can clarify until the cows come home if I know what you need made clear.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by brauneyz » Thu Nov 13, 2008 6:29 pm

All quotes from landrew, with my responses:
It's very simple. Remove the competing distractions and school will become more interesting. Huge industries are based on grabbing childrens' attention and compelling them to buy things they find interesting. Electronic media, electronic games, TV, junk food, music and drugs are tough competition for school to compete against.


None of these activities occur during school hours or in the classroom so I do not agree that they are competing. They compete with other activities that perhaps we engaged in when we were younger - playing tag, building snowmen, eating mom's home-baked cookies, or walking two miles to the lake to go swimming. You can only argue about the school experience itself, which includes teachers, teaching styles, visual aids etc.
It doesn't matter what ridiculous name you call it, or how trite you think it is, the idea is that if you take away the distractions, better learning might occur. I am not calling for doing anything; its every parent's right to raise stupid children.


Here you have switched from what the student finds interesting to evaluating better learning. I agree that fewer distractions lead to better learning, but you have changed the subject from the OP's question. That's fine, but let's admit that. That's why I ask for clarification.
My simple assertion is that there is competition between education and entertainment, and the entertainment often wins. If you don't like that opinion, its noted, but if you present some thinking of your own, instead of telling us all how much you dislike mine, it would be more interesting.


I would argue that even in our day, given a choice, entertainment would always trump education. That's how kids are. No surprise there. It is the adult's responsibility to see that the educational goals are met, and I don't think that means combining the two so education is entertaining. Why capitulate to those basic distinctions? Sure, it 'feels' better if the work is fun, but that's hardly reality. Sometimes unpleasant tasks need to be accomplished so why sugarcoat it. We used to call those character building exercises.

Isn't "not choosing an abundance" the same as restricting access to something? Or is it all based on choice? That's been tried many times before, giving kids a choice to do what they want, but I don't think the results were stellar.


Here, I was referring to my personal belief system of imposing moderation on myself or my kids. The 'restricting access' question to you was with regards to government intervention. Just because I would not let my kids watch 5 hours of TV a day does not mean I want the gov't controlling what and how much comes through my TV.
I'm just talking about creating an atmosphere more conducive to learning. Electronic entertainment devices and drugs are banned in the classrooms for a reason, they do interfere with learning. A parent can restrict access at home without being charged with child abuse. I'm saying that the absence of distractions results in better learning. It's great if kids can learn the self-discipline to learn, but don't rely on that alone.


These electronic devices also include computers and other audio visual aids that can be used effectively in teaching, so I'd be leery about lumping all this together.

On edit: It occurs to me that me that the focus has been shifted here. I apologize for hijacking the OP's thread. The question was , "How do we make school more interesting?" I am arguing instead, "Should we make school more interesting?" My bad... :(
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Thu Nov 13, 2008 7:30 pm

brauneyz wrote:None of these activities occur during school hours or in the classroom so I do not agree that they are competing. They compete with other activities that perhaps we engaged in when we were younger - playing tag, building snowmen, eating mom's home-baked cookies, or walking two miles to the lake to go swimming. You can only argue about the school experience itself, which includes teachers, teaching styles, visual aids etc.

I can't buy that. The more appealing the distraction, the more distracted the kid will become.

All those natural play activities you listed feed a child's natural desire to learn. It's questionable how much useful knowledge and skill you learn from artificial stimuli manufactured specifically as a "junk-food" substitute for real play activity. Electronic media has some educational value, but not much. Sure, a Twinkie or a bag of Cheetos has some nutritional value but not much.

I think you miss the point; a quality education is harder to achieve when you're surrounded by junk.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by bigtim » Thu Nov 13, 2008 8:15 pm

Hell, grownups will often have entertainment trump what they "should" do.

Distractions and education don't quite correlate. The assumption by many is when using "education" they are referring to class-room time. In this regard there are no vending machines, televisions, video games, or anything other than puberty interfering in education. Most, if not all, US schools now have cell phone policies that if you text or use them in class you get a trip to the principal's office and in some cases the teacher will confiscate them as well. This includes hand-held gaming systems (which most schools have a don’t bring it to school policy).

How to teach children is something that a lot of folks have spent their entire life learning how to do. We have some very gifted and very astute teachers (as well as some pretty messed up ones). As children age the way they learn changes... in addition to the boy/girl differences you also have family difference individual differences.

One of the biggest complaints I have is the damned test the kids have to take for some federal mandate. I can't tell you the degree of effort the schools go through preparing these kids to take those tests. Quite often that is what the entire curriculum is based on. Instead of "real" learning kids are being prepared to score well on tests.

Want to know the biggest distraction in schools? Being hungry.

Another distraction are the "rules" schools institute. There can be no chase games, no tag, no more dodge ball, many of the games we grew up playing, games that young kids need to play in order to invigorate, stimulate and release stress, are not allowed any longer.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by billontherock » Fri Nov 14, 2008 12:10 am

When I was 10. My mother tried to discourage my reading of trash science fiction, so of course I soon became addicted. When I couldn't find sci-fi I read historical novels, war stories, adventures, geography and science. The addiction still holds.

School was getting in the way of reading so I learned how to take tests, if you are generally quiet and pass tests then they allow you to read all day if you are discrete. Test taking, especially multiple guess is largely a problem of semantics; two of the answers don't answer the question and a coin toss will get you 75%. It also helps to read the texts the first week of each school year, note the bold print. This method requires a pretty good grasp of English, best way to get that, read.

I wish I had more math. That's one subject that requires thought and attention. I took math until it became somewhat difficult, and bailed. Regrets, regrets, nothing more futile than regrets.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by brauneyz » Fri Nov 14, 2008 12:49 am

billontherock wrote:I wish I had more math. That's one subject that requires thought and attention. I took math until it became somewhat difficult, and bailed. Regrets, regrets, nothing more futile than regrets.

So go back to night school and take more math! What's a bigger regret - that which you can fix or one you cannot? :wink:
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by jcity » Fri Nov 14, 2008 12:54 am

billontherock wrote:I wish I had more math.

Indeed. A coin toss actually gets you 50%.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by Matthew Ellard » Fri Nov 14, 2008 1:03 am

brauneyz wrote:
billontherock wrote:I wish I had more math. That's one subject that requires thought and attention. I took math until it became somewhat difficult, and bailed. Regrets, regrets, nothing more futile than regrets.

So go back to night school and take more math! What's a bigger regret - that which you can fix or one you cannot? :wink:


I went back to uni at 36years old and did 6years law at night and worked during the day. It killed me but it was worth it just for the general education subjects alone.

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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by berniemk » Wed Sep 16, 2009 9:28 am

You are assuming that one can "make" school interesting. Some students just aren't interested, and nothing anyone can do can change that.


So what? Some good is still good, and the more good teaching and good learning the better the education...which still leaves us with the question of how to help children learn.

The more involvement by students themselves, and parents and teaches, and some teacher finese is needed.

But the mainthing, especially in higher grades is for the teacher to tolerate and encourage exploration and responsibility, a kind of vote of confidence from the start.

1) Teachers can make things interesting by assigning tasks, projects, papers and presentations by the students, alone or in groups on topics students like and are interested in, including Sci-Fi, music stars, sports, home decorating, TV programs, etc. etc. That's a responsibility of good teachers...passing federal examinations is important but if the individualized subjects and projects are interesting enough, students can be included in getting the exam stuff over with to get on to their individual interests in their schooling.

2) School topics and progress requires gradual exposure to new material and making the students successful early on to peak their interest. Some positive reinforcement is always better, but teachers need to understand that, i.e. be taught about it by their schools, if not appreciated.

3) Interest, interest, interest. Students know what those topice of interest are, and they will let adults know if asked.

4) The bottom line is that a lot more can be accomplished when teacher and student work together. The teacher has to be skilled enough to be a motivational psychologist and a teacher, and tolerate some mixing it up with students.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Thu Sep 17, 2009 7:51 pm

Guess where kids do the best in school?

Where school is the most interesting thing in their lives.

Sometimes it's a great teacher who knew how to make everything interesting.

Other times it's in a bleak landscape, where there's nothing all around except miles of snow or miles of sand. Schooling was the far more interesting than watching your dog run away (for 3 days straight).

Other times, it's the parents, not too much TV, unless it was educational (they took the knobs off) , and not too much other electric entertainment (like video games and videos). Those things can't help but distract from education (they're designed to get kids' attention after all).

I say we lock up the little bastards in boarding schools again. Everybody wins.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by Gord » Fri Sep 18, 2009 6:00 pm

landrew wrote:I say we lock up the little bastards in boarding schools again. Everybody wins.

NOW yer talkin'!
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Fri Sep 18, 2009 7:10 pm

Gord wrote:
landrew wrote:I say we lock up the little bastards in boarding schools again. Everybody wins.

NOW yer talkin'!

It was tongue-in-cheek.
Didn't I convey that?
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by Gord » Fri Sep 18, 2009 8:57 pm

landrew wrote:
Gord wrote:
landrew wrote:I say we lock up the little bastards in boarding schools again. Everybody wins.

NOW yer talkin'!

It was tongue-in-cheek.
Didn't I convey that?

Spare the rod,
spoil my fun.
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"Imagine an ennobling of what could be" -- the New Age BS Generator site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by rrichar911 » Sat Sep 19, 2009 3:50 am

mater deum wrote:This is an interesting talk by Sir Ken Robinson.

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/66

He makes a great point about our hierarchy of education. Math and languages at the top, then the humanities, then the arts. And in 'arts' we have the serious ones like music ans maybe visual arts.

Kids are taught from square one (Grade one) that you are either 'smart' or 'dumb'. Not good in math? "You are not one of the smart kids here" is basically what you feel the system is tellling you about yourself.

Why couldn't a child focus on dance? Well, it's not a 'serious' subject and "You can't make money doing that. That's just a fluff subject."

It's too bad our system of educating the young fails so many.



99% of people have to work hard to learn math. The number of people naturally good at it, is very small. Math is logic. When we learn neural paths are formed in our brain. thus one can become smart, provided smart is defined as the ability to think logically.

I am not aware of the logic of dance, other than chicks like to dance, and if you can dance , it can help you get laid. It is after all about emotions which do not have to be and seldom are the result of correct reasoning. Very little is these days, which would be the real failure of education.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by landrew » Sat Sep 19, 2009 4:52 am

rrichar911 wrote:
mater deum wrote:This is an interesting talk by Sir Ken Robinson.

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/66

He makes a great point about our hierarchy of education. Math and languages at the top, then the humanities, then the arts. And in 'arts' we have the serious ones like music ans maybe visual arts.

Kids are taught from square one (Grade one) that you are either 'smart' or 'dumb'. Not good in math? "You are not one of the smart kids here" is basically what you feel the system is tellling you about yourself.

Why couldn't a child focus on dance? Well, it's not a 'serious' subject and "You can't make money doing that. That's just a fluff subject."

It's too bad our system of educating the young fails so many.



99% of people have to work hard to learn math. The number of people naturally good at it, is very small. Math is logic. When we learn neural paths are formed in our brain. thus one can become smart, provided smart is defined as the ability to think logically.

I am not aware of the logic of dance, other than chicks like to dance, and if you can dance , it can help you get laid. It is after all about emotions which do not have to be and seldom are the result of correct reasoning. Very little is these days, which would be the real failure of education.

Maybe its me, but I find mathematically minded people a bit boring.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by finallyskeptic » Sun Oct 25, 2009 1:44 pm

I was born intelligent, education destroyed me.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by OlegTheBatty » Sun Oct 25, 2009 3:48 pm

finallyskeptic wrote:I was born intelligent, education destroyed me.


No need to give up. Indoctrination doesn't destroy brain cells, it merely puts them to sleep. You can wake them up if you choose to.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by finallyskeptic » Mon Oct 26, 2009 9:27 am

OlegTheBatty wrote:
finallyskeptic wrote:I was born intelligent, education destroyed me.


No need to give up. Indoctrination doesn't destroy brain cells, it merely puts them to sleep. You can wake them up if you choose to.

That is why I came here to question.
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Re: What would it take to make school interesting?

Post by tkrawforQ3Kn4 » Thu Oct 29, 2009 9:28 pm

Some hard choices about swallowing political pride in lieu of wallowing in the inescapable reality of dwindling resources means, according to my theory of logical analysis the following course of action:

1) Speech Teachers everywhere should teach a very basic form of Socratic, itinerant logic before teaching the various forms of communication

2) Curricula everywhere should integrate that subsystem of analysis, inquiry and deliberation into the nature of all required and General Studies courses by allowing students and their parents greater flexibility in the design, personalization and Goal Projection of specific programs administered according to all current general benchmarks.

3) Bring the professional world such as Google, George Lucas LTD as well as current Local, State and Federal atmospheres of Government closer to the classroom for the specific purposes of : a) observation b) education and c) informal consultation on current real world issues regarding millage, public derivatives and state deficits, climate change, Afghanistan and health care insurance reform.

Make school much more important by increasing the stakes for involvement and back that choice with whatever change in the law is necessary and I guarantee the cost of education will lessen and both the value and productivity will increase ten maybe twenty times fold.

In my system of logical analysis, this is THE main thing that absolutely needs to happen across the board. And yes: all of these things will make school much more fun. Indeed.

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