Creationism in Colorado

Methods and means of supporting critical thinking in education
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kennyc
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Creationism in Colorado

Post by kennyc » Fri Jan 25, 2013 9:26 pm

If anyone reading this is in Colorado (or otherwise for that matter) please let your state representatives know what you think. You know what I think. This is total BS and should never have even been introduced!
Creationism Creeps into Colorado

By Phil Plait


I live in Boulder, Colorado, which is a bastion of scientific research. There are four major space science centers here (CU-Boulder, SwRI, the Space Science Institute, and Ball Aerospace), two major atmospheric research centers (UCAR and NCAR), as well as NIST and many other well-known science research centers.

But the state of Colorado, apparently, still wants to live in the 15th century: Just a few days ago, a bill was introduced into my home state’s legislature that would allow teachers “to miseducate students about evolution, whether by teaching creationism as a scientifically credible alternative or merely by misrepresenting evolution as scientifically controversial.”

Those words are from my good friend and tireless hero for science Eugenie Scott of the National Center for Science Education, an organization that has the goal of educating people about real science. The antiscience bill HB 13-1089 is one of the Orwellian-named “Academic Freedom” thrusts by creationists, where legislators claim they just want teachers to have freedom about what they can teach, but is in fact a clear and obvious attack on scientific fields that disagree with the beliefs of the conservative lawmakers. Don’t believe me? Here is the opening shot of the bill:

“The provisions of the acts direct teachers to create an environment that encourages students to intelligently and respectfully explore scientific questions and learn about scientific evidence related to biological and chemical evolution, global warming, and human cloning.”

If this were really about academic freedom, why is it so specific? Why not include all fields of science, instead of just those three? In fact, why not include all academic fields? I’d be fascinated to see literature, art, and math added to that. Or religious study…how about supplementary texts that show the contradictions in the Bible? I wonder how that would go over.

I’ll note that all the co-sponsors of this bill are, to a person, Republicans.
....
http://www.slate.com/blogs/bad_astronom ... eedom.html

More:
http://ncse.com/news/2013/01/antiscienc ... do-0014685
Kenny A. Chaffin
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