No queues into the kremas, aerial photos at Birkenau

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Balmoral95
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Re: No queues into the kremas, aerial photos at Birkenau

Post by Balmoral95 » Wed Sep 19, 2018 3:55 am

Longerich. Good news, shorter than Hillberg... bad news, you'll never get through it.

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Re: No queues into the kremas, aerial photos at Birkenau

Post by Statistical Mechanic » Wed Sep 19, 2018 10:58 am

For me, Cesarani, then Hilberg, Longerich, Friedlander. But what never fails to amuse me are "revisionists" who haven't even cracked open a single work among the vast historical literature they wish to revise.
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Re: No queues into the kremas, aerial photos at Birkenau

Post by nickterry » Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:29 am

montgomery wrote: Thanks for your reply Nessie. I think that we may be able to concentrate more now on what you are posting without the usual distractions. There seems to be quite a big of 'ignore' going on and that's going to be good for the forum. And fwiw, I think we can rely on Balsamo to continue to contribute in a meaningful way. I'm very interested in the A-B gassing stories and so have asked him to supply a good book reference. Maybe you could do the same. Both pro and con would be appreciated by pro for now is fine.
Two basic and accessible (online open-access) sources on Auschwitz are:
1. Pressac's Auschwitz: Technique and Operation of the Gas Chambers (1989)
2. Robert Van Pelt's book-length report on Auschwitz for the Irving vs Lipstadt trial in 2000, which was later reworked for publication as The Case for Auschwitz (2002).

Van Pelt is easier to read than Pressac and is a better introduction to the subject, Pressac supplements his main text with facsimiles, transcriptions and translations of documents, along with maps, blueprints and photos.

Links can be found on this page, along with links to other open-access publications as well as online archives, just scroll down towards the end for the Auschwitz literature section or find 'Pressac'
http://holocaustcontroversies.blogspot. ... s-and.html

Commercial/library books of importance would start with the Anatomy of the Auschwitz Death Camp edited collection, which includes contributions from Pressac and Van Pelt. This is widely available commercially (Amazon etc) and in many libraries. The 5 volume Auschwitz 1940-45 set is a must for more in-depth research; it's sold by the Auschwitz museum and other online bookstores in Poland, for a very affordable price considering it's 5 hardback volumes. Only larger libraries would hold copies, however.

Also available from the Auschwitz museum/online bookstores in Poland and in libraries - Franciszek Piper's books on the number of victims of Auschwitz, in German or English, would be in the first half dozen things one should read and digest.

The Auschwitz Chronicle or Kalendarium compiled by Danuta Czech would also be in the top six titles to read; this is available online for free in Italian translation (see the open access sources link page), commercially/in libraries in English and German.

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Re: No queues into the kremas, aerial photos at Birkenau

Post by Statistical Mechanic » Wed Sep 19, 2018 11:56 am

>> The 5 volume Auschwitz 1940-45 set is a must for more in-depth research

As a piker in this, I agree with all Nick's suggestions but really underscore the 5 volume camp history published by the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum. It is comprehensive, and the discussion is heavily empirical.

The only titles I'd add for those actually interested in starting to learn about the camp's history are Hermann Langbein's People in Auschwitz ( I still think that this is a great book) and possibly some of the museum documents/testimonies books from the Voices of Memory series (e.g., particularly in the present context no. 6 on the crematoria and gas chambers, which gives a flavor of some of the sources and how witnesses described their observations and experiences).

(apologies for edit whilst Nick was posting)
Last edited by Statistical Mechanic on Wed Sep 19, 2018 12:08 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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nickterry
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Re: No queues into the kremas, aerial photos at Birkenau

Post by nickterry » Wed Sep 19, 2018 12:07 pm

Statistical Mechanic wrote:>> The 5 volume Auschwitz 1940-45 set is a must for more in-depth research

As a piker in this, I agree with all Nick's suggestions but really underscore 5 volume camp history. It is comprehensive, and the discussion is heavily empirical. The only titles I'd add for those actually interested in the camp history are Hermann Langbein's People in Auschwitz and possibly some of the museum documents/testimonies books from the Voices of Memory series (e.g., particularly in the present context no. 6 on the crematoria and gas chambers, which gives a flavor of some of the sources and how witnesses described their observations and experiences).
Langbein's People in Auschwitz would be among the top-three recommendations in 'normal' contexts; the only other title mentioned so far which is as well-written is Van Pelt's report/book.

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Re: No queues into the kremas, aerial photos at Birkenau

Post by Statistical Mechanic » Wed Sep 19, 2018 12:09 pm

nickterry wrote:in 'normal' contexts
Granted. :)
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