History of Science

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scrmbldggs
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Re: History of Science

Post by scrmbldggs » Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:18 am

Upton_O_Goode wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:13 am
Matthew Ellard wrote:
Thu Nov 01, 2018 2:09 am

Poor little NAZI has to post on a USA based forum in English.......as his own German people can't stand him. I imagine him marching up and down German streets on his own. :D
Aha! I KNEW I recognized the style:


. :lol:
.
Lard, save me from your followers.

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Gord
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Re: History of Science

Post by Gord » Thu Nov 08, 2018 4:31 am

History of Science #27: Electricity.



Barely shocking.

Surprisingly, no mention of elephants.
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"Imagine an ennobling of what could be" -- the New Age BS Generator site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
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Upton_O_Goode
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Re: History of Science

Post by Upton_O_Goode » Thu Nov 08, 2018 1:22 pm

Thanks, Gord. I really enjoy these vignettes. But let me begin by praising your new avatar!

Now, regarding the history, as I’ve commented above, the nature of the medium forces a fairly high cutoff for the mention of names. Electromagnetic induction, for example, was discovered by Joseph Henry (17 December 1797--13 May 1878), a physicist and professor at Princeton after 1832, who made the discovery in 1831, almost simultaneously with Faraday (22 September 1791--25 August 1867). Faraday, of course, had the advantage of communicating what he had discovered to the transcendent genius James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831--5 November 1879), and as a result, Faraday's law that a changing magnetic field creates an electric field became one of the four famous Maxwell laws. In honor of Henry's work, the unit of electrical inductance is named the henry.

One must stop at some point, but I do hope this topic will be revisited, as Maxwell’s laws, combined with the Lorentz law for the force on a charge moving in a magnetic field, was the inspiration for the special theory of relativity. Maxwell’s great achievement was to bring Newtonian mechanics and electrical/magnetic phenomena together. (He actually had a mechanical model of electric and magnetic fields, and it was on that basis that he computed the velocity required for a combined pair of electric and magnetic waves to propagate itself. That was in 1861. Bernhard Riemann (1826—1866) had published a paper a few years earlier with much the same result. The problem, given the Lorentz law, was that two observers in relative motion at constant velocity would agree about the force on a moving particle (that agreement is a consequence of Newton’s laws of motion), and they would agree about the strength of the magnetic field, but, given that the magnetic force was proportional to the velocity of the moving particle, they would disagree about the electric field. That asymmetry set Einstein thinking, and…..

Here are a couple of verdicts on Edison.

First, in the Washington, Iowa Evening Journal, December 28, 1932:
George S. Holmes wrote:
He captured light and caged it in a glass,
Then harnessed it forever to a wire;
He gave men robots with no back to tire
In bearing burdens for the toiling mass.

He freed the tongue in wood and wax and brass,
Imbued dull images with motion’s fire,
Transmuted metal into human choir.
These man-made miracles he brought to pass.

Bulbs banish night along the Great White Way.
Thin threads of copper throb with might unseen.
On silver curtains shadow-actors play,
That walk and talk from magic-mouthed machine,
While continents converse through skies o’erhead.
And yet fools say that Edison is dead!
Second, an opposing view:
H.L. Mencken wrote: Edison's life-work, like his garrulous and nonsensical talk, has been mainly a curse to humanity: he has greatly augmented its stock of damned nuisances.
One final point. Except for Faraday, who was no mathematician but had a prodigious geometric imagination, most of the European physicists were good mathematicians. Ampère even tried to provide a proof that every continuous function has a derivative. (Well, continuity didn't have an agree-upon definition at that point, so he can be forgiven for providing what looks now like a fallacious argument. Weierstrass later gave a nice example of a continuous function that does not have a derivative at any point whatever.) The Americans really weren't much in that area.
“When plunder becomes a way of life for a group of men in a society, over the course of time they create for themselves a legal system that authorizes it and a moral code that glorifies it.”

― Frédéric Bastiat (1801–1850), French economist

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landrew
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Re: History of Science

Post by landrew » Thu Nov 08, 2018 7:09 pm

I'm a bit of a "real history" buff (whatever that is).
I tend to agree with Henry Ford that "history is bunk" or whatever he actually said.
We tend to get the spin instead of the real scoop for what actually may have been the actual history. Sometimes we just have to scrape together whatever's available and give it our best guess.
Thomas Edison may have done a lot to advance technology in his time, but he was also a competitive bastard and took a lot of credit for the work of others. Tesla was a decent chap, who practically invented the electrical age, but he had most of the rewards stolen away by people who tended to get their spin into the history books, and whom we often regard as great heroes of history.
The job of a skeptic is to investigate the unexplained; not to explain the uninvestigated.

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Gord
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Re: History of Science

Post by Gord » Thu Nov 08, 2018 9:47 pm

Upton_O_Goode wrote:
Thu Nov 08, 2018 1:22 pm
Thanks, Gord. I really enjoy these vignettes. But let me begin by praising your new avatar!
Which one? I'm still in transition mode and can't decide which avatar to use.
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"Imagine an ennobling of what could be" -- the New Age BS Generator site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
#ANDAMOVIE
Is Trump in jail yet?

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landrew
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Re: History of Science

Post by landrew » Thu Nov 08, 2018 10:23 pm

Gord wrote:
Thu Nov 08, 2018 9:47 pm
Upton_O_Goode wrote:
Thu Nov 08, 2018 1:22 pm
Thanks, Gord. I really enjoy these vignettes. But let me begin by praising your new avatar!
Which one? I'm still in transition mode and can't decide which avatar to use.
No need to thank me for finding it.
The job of a skeptic is to investigate the unexplained; not to explain the uninvestigated.

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Gord
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Re: History of Science

Post by Gord » Thu Nov 08, 2018 11:43 pm

landrew wrote:
Thu Nov 08, 2018 10:23 pm
Gord wrote:
Thu Nov 08, 2018 9:47 pm
Upton_O_Goode wrote:
Thu Nov 08, 2018 1:22 pm
Thanks, Gord. I really enjoy these vignettes. But let me begin by praising your new avatar!
Which one? I'm still in transition mode and can't decide which avatar to use.
No need to thank me for finding it.
How hard could it be? It's right there in the corner of my post.
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"Imagine an ennobling of what could be" -- the New Age BS Generator site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
#ANDAMOVIE
Is Trump in jail yet?

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Gord
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Re: History of Science

Post by Gord » Wed Nov 14, 2018 1:30 am

"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"Imagine an ennobling of what could be" -- the New Age BS Generator site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
#ANDAMOVIE
Is Trump in jail yet?

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Gord
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Re: History of Science

Post by Gord » Tue Nov 27, 2018 8:54 am

History of Science #29: Cinema, Radio, and Television



There's an elephant, buuuuuuut it dies.
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"Imagine an ennobling of what could be" -- the New Age BS Generator site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
#ANDAMOVIE
Is Trump in jail yet?

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Gord
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Re: History of Science

Post by Gord » Tue Dec 04, 2018 2:11 am

History of Science #30: The Mind/Brain

"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"Imagine an ennobling of what could be" -- the New Age BS Generator site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
#ANDAMOVIE
Is Trump in jail yet?