This is interesting.. Thoughts about this??

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Shen1986
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This is interesting.. Thoughts about this??

Postby Shen1986 » Wed Jul 16, 2014 7:56 am

Nervenarzt. 2007 Nov;78(11):1303-9.
[Sighted and blind in one person: a case report and conclusions on the psychoneurobiology of vision].
[Article in German]
Waldvogel B1, Ullrich A, Strasburger H.
Author information
1Praxis für Psychotherapie, Enhuberstrasse 1, 80333 München. mail2@bruno-waldvogel.de
Abstract

We present a patient with dissociative identity disorder (DID) who after 15 years of diagnosed cortical blindness gradually regained sight during psychotherapeutic treatment. At first only a few personality states regained vision, whereas others remained blind. This was confirmed by electrophysiological measurement, in which visual evoked potentials (VEP) were absent in the blind personality states but normal and stable in the seeing states. The switch between these states could happen momentarily. As a neural basis of such psychogenic blindness, we assume a top-down modulation of activity in the primary visual pathway, possibly at the level of the thalamus or the primary visual cortex. Therefore VEPs do not allow distinction of psychogenic blindness from organic disruption of the visual pathway. In summary, psychogenic blindness seems to suppress visual information at an early neural stage.


Taken from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17611729

Here is some skeptical info but I do not know what to think about it:

http://www.skepdic.com/mpd.html
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Shen1986
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Re: This is interesting.. Thoughts about this??

Postby Shen1986 » Wed Jul 16, 2014 8:48 am

Explanation possibilities:

We present a patient with dissociative identity disorder (DID) who after 15 years of diagnosed cortical blindness gradually regained sight during psychotherapeutic treatment.


- Neuroplasticity because thanks to treatment he was able to see again.

- He was not blind completely to begin with.

- DID is caused by trauma in life and all normal material things which means NO paranormal things here even when the study is true:

The cause of DID is controversial, with debate occurring between supporters of different hypotheses: that DID is a reaction to trauma; that DID is produced iatrogenically by inappropriate psychotherapeutic techniques that cause a patient to enact the role of a patient with DID; and newer hypotheses involving memory processing that allows for the possibility that trauma-causing dissociation can occur after childhood in DID, as it does in PTSD. It has been suggested that all the trauma-based and stress-related disorders be placed in one category that would include both DID and PTSD.[28] Disturbed and altered sleep has also been suggested as having a role in dissociative disorders in general and specifically in DID, alterations in environments also largely effecting the DID patient.[29]


Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociati ... der#Causes

Also there is another problem DID is a quite controversial thing:

DID is one of the most controversial psychiatric disorders with no clear consensus regarding its diagnosis or treatment.[3] Research on effectiveness of treatment has been concerned primarily with clinical approaches and case studies. Dissociative symptoms range from common lapses in attention, becoming distracted by something else, and daydreaming, to pathological dissociative disorders.[6] No systematic, empirically-supported definition of "dissociation" exists.[7][8]


Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociati ... y_disorder

Also the Therapist induce thing is quite controversial because it can induce false memories:

Therapist-induced[edit]

The prevailing post-traumatic model of dissociation and dissociative disorders is contested.[8] It has been hypothesized that symptoms of DID may be created by therapists using techniques to "recover" memories (such as the use of hypnosis to "access" alter identities, facilitate age regression or retrieve memories) on suggestible individuals.[14][15][16][30][37] Referred to as the "sociocognitive model" (SCM), it proposes that DID is due to a person consciously or unconsciously behaving in certain ways promoted by cultural stereotypes,[30] with unwitting therapists providing cues through improper therapeutic techniques. This behavior is enhanced by media portrayals of DID.[8]


Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dissociati ... st-induced

Here is about it:

There are several individuals and groups that have published guidelines, criticisms or cautions about recovered memory therapy and techniques to stimulate recall:
In the Brandon Report, a set of training, practice, research and professional development recommendations, the United Kingdom's Royal College of Psychiatrists advised psychiatrists to avoid use of RMT or any "memory recovery techniques", citing a lack of evidence to support the accuracy of memories recovered in this way.[28]
In 2004, the government of the Health Council of the Netherlands issued a report in response to inquiries from professionals regarding RMT and memories of traumatic child sexual abuse.[11] The Health Council stated that while traumatic childhood experiences were major risk factors for psychological problems in adulthood, most traumatic memories are well remembered but can be forgotten or become inaccessible though the influence of specific circumstances precludes a simple description of the relationship between memory and trauma. The report also notes that memories can be confabulated, re-interpreted and even apparently vivid or dramatic memories can be false, a risk that is increased when therapists use suggestive techniques, attempt to link symptoms to past trauma, with certain patients and through the use of methods to stimulate memories.[11]
The Australian Hypnotherapists Association (AHA) issued a similar statement, for contexts where false memories of child sexual abuse may arise. The AHA acknowledges that child sexual abuse is serious, damaging and at least some memories are genuine, while cautioning that some questioning techniques and interventions may lead to illusory memories leading to false beliefs about abuse.[29]
The Canadian Psychological Association has issued guidelines for psychologists addressing recovered memories.[30] Psychologists are urged to be aware of their limitations in knowledge and training regarding memory, trauma and development and "that there is no constellation of symptoms which is diagnostic of child sexual abuse". The guidelines also urge caution and awareness of the benefits and limitations of "relaxation, hypnosis, guided imagery, free associations, inner child exercises, age regression, body memory interpretation, body massage, dream interpretation, and the use of projective techniques" and special caution regarding any legal involvement of memories, abuse and therapy.


Taken from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recovered-memory_therapy
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kennyc
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Re: This is interesting.. Thoughts about this??

Postby kennyc » Wed Jul 16, 2014 11:18 am

I think there have been other cases like this. As you say injury, neuroplastisicity i.e. physical trauma and recovery, psychological trauma and recovery....

There are also a number of studies -- perhaps not directly related -- on 'blindsight' which is blind people being able to see, but not consciously...or not with direct subjective awareness of being able to see.
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Gawdzilla Sama
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Re: This is interesting.. Thoughts about this??

Postby Gawdzilla Sama » Wed Jul 16, 2014 11:37 am

"hysterical blindness" is old news.
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Re: This is interesting.. Thoughts about this??

Postby Matthew Ellard » Thu Jul 17, 2014 1:28 am

kennyc wrote:I think there have been other cases like this. As you say injury, neuroplastisicity i.e. physical trauma and recovery, psychological trauma and recovery....


I think Kenny is right, in that this may include technical aspects beyond the understanding of ourselves. I'm only saying that because of people who are blind from strokes who can then move through obstacle courses.

http://phenomena.nationalgeographic.com ... awareness/

I did read the book on this subject, "Subliminal" Leonard Mlodinow, but some technical aspects were beyond my understanding. However, keep up the good work.


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