For the past week, inspired by this Forum:

Read any good books lately?
nmblum88
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For the past week, inspired by this Forum:

Postby nmblum88 » Wed Oct 01, 2014 4:07 pm

The Science of Words, George Miller (finished half an hour ago… and a fine way to start the day AND to start another book, armed with this refresher course in what it means to be an animal gifted with the boon of language).


NMB
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Your fanciful card games, movie sojourns and exciting overseas trips, that all take place within the four walls of an aged care retirement home, do not suggest your own children offered you the care, I gave my parents."

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Gord
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Re: For the past week, inspired by this Forum:

Postby Gord » Thu Oct 02, 2014 6:18 am

I was thinking about the word "hole" recently. Whether you have a hole seems to depend on the material being examined.

If it's a shirt, you only have a hole if it goes all the way through.

If it's the Earth, a hole has to just barely penetrate the surface.

Makes ya think, eh?
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
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nmblum88
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Re: For the past week, inspired by this Forum:

Postby nmblum88 » Thu Oct 02, 2014 6:29 am

Gord wrote:I was thinking about the word "hole" recently. Whether you have a hole seems to depend on the material being examined.

If it's a shirt, you only have a hole if it goes all the way through.

If it's the Earth, a hole has to just barely penetrate the surface.

Makes ya think, eh?


Not yet.
But if it made YOU think and you are satisfied with the thought, that's good enough for me…. I'm not competing with you, but operating in tandem.

However, if you are really interested in being able to ascribe value to words that either intrigue or offend you, may I suggest (my oh my but it DOES take courage to do this! ) the "Cambridge Encyclopedia of Language," by David Crystal…
Of for that matter, any of the books on language by Crystal….
Sometimes the connection between the complications inherent in language and those inherent in ideas is not taken seriously.
Or it is forgotten.
Or never really thought of at all.

NMB
Skepticism:
" Norma, you poor sad lonely alcoholic. You entire life is devoted to interrupting other people's posts on this forum, regardless of the topic, to tell them what's wrong with them. The irony is, here you are doing it again, with this very post.
Your fanciful card games, movie sojourns and exciting overseas trips, that all take place within the four walls of an aged care retirement home, do not suggest your own children offered you the care, I gave my parents."

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Gord
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Re: For the past week, inspired by this Forum:

Postby Gord » Thu Oct 02, 2014 8:08 am

I've been thinking about the word "hole" for more than a week.

I like words. I like finding out how they developed from previous forms of the same word. I've got a couple of books on Indo-European languages, a book or two on word origins, and I often check the internet for etymologies, like this: http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=hole

Old English hol "orifice, hollow place, cave, perforation," from Proto-Germanic *hul (cognates: Old Saxon, Old Frisian, Old High German hol, Middle Dutch hool, Old Norse holr, German hohl "hollow," Gothic us-hulon "to hollow out"), from PIE root *kel- (2) "to cover, conceal" (see cell).

There are a lot of words that go back to the PIE root *kel-. For example, Hell, which comes from the Old Norse name Hel: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hel_(location)#Etymology

The old Old Norse word Hel derives from Proto-Germanic *haljō, which means "one who covers up or hides something", which itself derives from Proto-Indo-European *kel-, meaning "conceal". The cognate in English is the word Hell which is from the Old English forms hel and helle. Related terms are Old Frisian, helle, German Hölle and Gothic halja. Other words more distantly related include hole, hollow, hall, helmet and cell, all from the aforementioned Indo-European root *kel-.
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
#ANDAMOVIE


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