The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

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The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby Upton_O_Goode » Wed Jul 26, 2017 1:16 pm

As I've posted a few times previously, I get great amusement from the absurdities of the end-time enthusiasts. I've had a long-term interest in the bumptious Jack Van Impe and his department-store-mannequin wife Rexella. (Excuse me, I mean DOCTORS Jack and Rexella Van Impe. More on that below.)

Anyway, I have looked into some of his books and want to present some of his more egregious howlers to share my amusement. I'll start with a series taken from his book 2001: On the Edge of Eternity, written in the late 1990s. Here's gem No. 1:

DOCTOR Jack Van Impe wrote:In my research I was particularly moved by a comment made by the great scientist Sir Isaac Newton, by all accounts one of the most formidable thinkers in the history of our world and a towering figure in the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century. Newton said, ‘About the time of the end, a body of men will be raised up who will turn their attention to the prophecies and insist on their literal interpretation in the midst of much clamor and opposition.’ Newton’s words are especially fascinating because in his day, people still regarded the world as square—the kind of flat, frightening planet where sea captains, their ships and precious cargo were forever in danger of falling into the great abyss where dragons lurked to devour and destroy all unsuspecting prey.


Oh my dear Jack! You should have read Alexander Pope first: "A little learning is a dangerous thing. Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring." Let me enlighten you. Medieval misconceptions held by uneducated people about a flat earth had been laid to rest more than a century before Newton was born, and no one EVER thought the Earth was a square. And even in the Middle Ages, educated people knew the earth was a sphere.

To be continued....
Last edited by Upton_O_Goode on Wed Jul 26, 2017 1:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Reserve a part of your wrath ; you have not seen the worst yet. You suppose that this war has been a criminal blunder and an exceptional horror ; you imagine that before long reason will prevail, and all these inferior people that govern the world will be swept aside, and your own party will reform everything and remain always in office. You are mistaken."

George Santayana, "Tipperary" (1918)

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The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, II

Postby Upton_O_Goode » Wed Jul 26, 2017 1:24 pm

It's hard to catch Jack actually connecting Biblical prophecy to current events in a definite way. He knows how dangerous that is for someone who wants a reputation for prophecy. Just consider what happened to poor Harold Camping back in 2011. Jack's technique is to quote secular scientists who speculate on the future. Then, if the speculation is wrong, well, he never said it was in the Bible. What he does instead is put the Bible verses that seem to relate to this speculation right alongside it so that the reader is led to believe that there is a connection, then ask rhetorically, "Could this be what the Bible was talking about?" His listeners and readers will eagerly conclude, not only that it could be, but that it actually is.

But once in a while, he slips up and makes a prediction in his own name. Gem No. 2 is such a case, again from his mid-1990s book 2001: On the Edge of Eternity:

DOCTOR Jack Van Impe wrote:As we move closer to the year 2000, we discover that the United States will assuredly be forced to use its remaining gold to buy back Eurodollars and Petrodollars. When the last of this gold has been used to prop up these dollars, the day of the dollar will be finished, and a new system will become necessary.


"Assuredly," Dr. Jack? So, in this year of 2017, we're no longer using dollars, right? And the US is caught in financial bondage to the oil cartels, its gold reserves exhausted?
Last edited by Upton_O_Goode on Wed Jul 26, 2017 1:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Reserve a part of your wrath ; you have not seen the worst yet. You suppose that this war has been a criminal blunder and an exceptional horror ; you imagine that before long reason will prevail, and all these inferior people that govern the world will be swept aside, and your own party will reform everything and remain always in office. You are mistaken."

George Santayana, "Tipperary" (1918)

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The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, III

Postby Upton_O_Goode » Wed Jul 26, 2017 1:31 pm

Nothing excites an end-timer more than that number 666. (Hexacosia hexeconta hex in Greek, the source of the English word "hex," maybe, I'm not sure. But some manuscripts have it as 606.) Here's Jack holding forth on it in gem No. 3, from the same book.

DOCTOR Jack Van Impe wrote:I’m now certain that the nations of the world are currently being brainwashed into accepting this code as normal and necessary to pave the way for its becoming an absolute requirement during the reign of the Antichrist. If you think such concerns cannot be backed up with concrete evidence, then I encourage you to read the following list of thirty-three different places the number ‘666’ has either shown up in the past or is currently appearing.


This list contains such impressive items as “Numerous computer receipts across the U.S. have contained a ‘666’ number” and “Armstrong ‘Sundial’ has had a floor tile coded ‘666-13’” and “The identification tags on Japanese parts received by the Caterpillar Company, Peoria, Illinois, contained the number ‘666'."

In fairness, I should say that the first example he gave, which I didn't quote, does relate to the Antichrist. He points out that the number 666 occurs in advertising for the movies Omen I, Omen II, and The Final Conflict. (Well, DUH!)

Poor Jack! He had to compile his list before Google existed, so he obviously relied on chance communications from his flock, an example of which is probably the item from the Caterpillar Company in Peoria. Equipped with modern technology, I went searching for occurrences of my favorite number, namely 371. A Google search for `371' yielded 432,000,000 results. Here are just a few from the first page, all of them having the same earth-shaking significance that Jack's examples of '666' have:

35 U.S. Code § 371 - National stage: Commencement | US Law | LII ...
https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/35/371
1. Cached
Receipt from the International Bureau of copies of international applications with any amendments to the claims, international search reports, and international ...

MARC 21 Format for Authority Data: 371: Address (Network ...
https://www.loc.gov/marc/authority/ad371.html
1. Cached
May 17, 2017 - Distinction between field 371 (Address) and field 370 (Associated place): Field 370 (Associated place) includes information about places ...

371 Battery | Energizer
http://www.energizer.com/specialty-batt ... 71-battery
1. Cached
2. Similar
The Energizer® 371 Silver Oxide Battery replaces these: 280-31, 370/371, 371BP, D370/371, SB-AN, SR69, SR920W, TR920SW.

xkcd: Compiler Complaint
https://xkcd.com/371/
1. Cached
2. Similar
Compiler Complaint. |< · < Prev · Random · Next > · >|. Permanent link to this comic: https://xkcd.com/371/ Image URL (for hotlinking/embedding): ...

To be continued...
"Reserve a part of your wrath ; you have not seen the worst yet. You suppose that this war has been a criminal blunder and an exceptional horror ; you imagine that before long reason will prevail, and all these inferior people that govern the world will be swept aside, and your own party will reform everything and remain always in office. You are mistaken."

George Santayana, "Tipperary" (1918)

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby scrmbldggs » Wed Jul 26, 2017 3:15 pm

666 seems powerful enough to spell doom for the princeling son-in-law of the Antiantechrist. :-P
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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby Upton_O_Goode » Wed Jul 26, 2017 5:40 pm

scrmbldggs wrote:666 seems powerful enough to spell doom for the princeling son-in-law of the Antiantechrist. :-P


Oh my God! Don't tell the Rapture-Ready freaks. They all worship Trump as the Fourth Person of the Trinity. This will destroy their faith.
"Reserve a part of your wrath ; you have not seen the worst yet. You suppose that this war has been a criminal blunder and an exceptional horror ; you imagine that before long reason will prevail, and all these inferior people that govern the world will be swept aside, and your own party will reform everything and remain always in office. You are mistaken."

George Santayana, "Tipperary" (1918)

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby ElectricMonk » Wed Jul 26, 2017 5:51 pm

For the rapture-nutjobs, it doesn't really matter if the Antichrist is for or against them, only that he shows up.
I've come up with a set of rules that describe our reactions to technologies:
Spoiler:
1. Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.
2. Anything that's invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.
3. Anything invented after you're thirty-five is against the natural order of things.
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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, III

Postby Gord » Wed Jul 26, 2017 8:01 pm

Upton_O_Goode wrote:...Hexacosia hexeconta hex in Greek, the source of the English word "hex," maybe, I'm not sure....

Probably not.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=hex

hex (v.)

1830, American English, from Pennsylvania German hexe "to practice witchcraft," from German hexen "to hex," related to Hexe "witch," from Middle High German hecse, hexse, from Old High German hagazussa (see hag). Noun meaning "magic spell" is first recorded 1909; earlier it meant "a witch" (1856).

hag (n.)

early 13c., "repulsive old woman" (rare before 16c.), probably from Old English hægtes, hægtesse "witch, sorceress, enchantress, fury," shortened on the assumption that -tes was a suffix. The Old English word is from Proto-Germanic *hagatusjon, which is of unknown origin. Dutch heks, German Hexe "witch" are similarly shortened from cognate Middle Dutch haghetisse, Old High German hagzusa....
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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, III

Postby Upton_O_Goode » Thu Jul 27, 2017 11:55 am

Gord wrote:
Upton_O_Goode wrote:...Hexacosia hexeconta hex in Greek, the source of the English word "hex," maybe, I'm not sure....

Probably not.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=hex

hex (v.)

1830, American English, from Pennsylvania German hexe "to practice witchcraft," from German hexen "to hex," related to Hexe "witch," from Middle High German hecse, hexse, from Old High German hagazussa (see hag). Noun meaning "magic spell" is first recorded 1909; earlier it meant "a witch" (1856).

hag (n.)

early 13c., "repulsive old woman" (rare before 16c.), probably from Old English hægtes, hægtesse "witch, sorceress, enchantress, fury," shortened on the assumption that -tes was a suffix. The Old English word is from Proto-Germanic *hagatusjon, which is of unknown origin. Dutch heks, German Hexe "witch" are similarly shortened from cognate Middle Dutch haghetisse, Old High German hagzusa....


So, just a phonetic coincidence. Those things are common, and misleading. Thanks for the information. I should have seen the connection with "hag,"
"Reserve a part of your wrath ; you have not seen the worst yet. You suppose that this war has been a criminal blunder and an exceptional horror ; you imagine that before long reason will prevail, and all these inferior people that govern the world will be swept aside, and your own party will reform everything and remain always in office. You are mistaken."

George Santayana, "Tipperary" (1918)

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby OlegTheBatty » Thu Jul 27, 2017 2:27 pm

Every time I see this thread's title, I wonder why there are words in the thread. I expect blank posts.
. . . with the satisfied air of a man who thinks he has an idea of his own because he has commented on the idea of another . . . - Alexandre Dumas 'The Count of Monte Cristo"

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby Upton_O_Goode » Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:48 pm

OlegTheBatty wrote:Every time I see this thread's title, I wonder why there are words in the thread. I expect blank posts.


Well, it's intended as sarcasm, but as others have pointed out to me, sarcasm doesn't always come across in a web post.
"Reserve a part of your wrath ; you have not seen the worst yet. You suppose that this war has been a criminal blunder and an exceptional horror ; you imagine that before long reason will prevail, and all these inferior people that govern the world will be swept aside, and your own party will reform everything and remain always in office. You are mistaken."

George Santayana, "Tipperary" (1918)

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby OlegTheBatty » Thu Jul 27, 2017 3:50 pm

!
. . . with the satisfied air of a man who thinks he has an idea of his own because he has commented on the idea of another . . . - Alexandre Dumas 'The Count of Monte Cristo"

There is no statement so absurd that it has not been uttered by some philosopher. - Cicero

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby scrmbldggs » Thu Jul 27, 2017 7:43 pm

OlegTheBatty wrote:!

!
.

Lard, save me from your followers.

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby OlegTheBatty » Thu Jul 27, 2017 8:19 pm

scrmbldggs wrote:
OlegTheBatty wrote:!

!

0
. . . with the satisfied air of a man who thinks he has an idea of his own because he has commented on the idea of another . . . - Alexandre Dumas 'The Count of Monte Cristo"

There is no statement so absurd that it has not been uttered by some philosopher. - Cicero

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby Upton_O_Goode » Thu Jul 27, 2017 8:22 pm

OlegTheBatty wrote:
scrmbldggs wrote:
OlegTheBatty wrote:!

!

0
"Reserve a part of your wrath ; you have not seen the worst yet. You suppose that this war has been a criminal blunder and an exceptional horror ; you imagine that before long reason will prevail, and all these inferior people that govern the world will be swept aside, and your own party will reform everything and remain always in office. You are mistaken."

George Santayana, "Tipperary" (1918)

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby Upton_O_Goode » Thu Jul 27, 2017 8:25 pm

Well, thanks for reading and posting, folks. It appears we have exhausted this topic. For me, it was cathartic.
"Reserve a part of your wrath ; you have not seen the worst yet. You suppose that this war has been a criminal blunder and an exceptional horror ; you imagine that before long reason will prevail, and all these inferior people that govern the world will be swept aside, and your own party will reform everything and remain always in office. You are mistaken."

George Santayana, "Tipperary" (1918)

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, III

Postby Gord » Thu Jul 27, 2017 9:23 pm

Upton_O_Goode wrote:
Gord wrote:
Upton_O_Goode wrote:...Hexacosia hexeconta hex in Greek, the source of the English word "hex," maybe, I'm not sure....

Probably not.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=hex

hex (v.)

1830, American English, from Pennsylvania German hexe "to practice witchcraft," from German hexen "to hex," related to Hexe "witch," from Middle High German hecse, hexse, from Old High German hagazussa (see hag). Noun meaning "magic spell" is first recorded 1909; earlier it meant "a witch" (1856).

hag (n.)

early 13c., "repulsive old woman" (rare before 16c.), probably from Old English hægtes, hægtesse "witch, sorceress, enchantress, fury," shortened on the assumption that -tes was a suffix. The Old English word is from Proto-Germanic *hagatusjon, which is of unknown origin. Dutch heks, German Hexe "witch" are similarly shortened from cognate Middle Dutch haghetisse, Old High German hagzusa....


So, just a phonetic coincidence. Those things are common, and misleading. Thanks for the information. I should have seen the connection with "hag,"

Your suggestion sounded plausible, so I looked it up. I'm actually excited to see the connected with "hag".

Words is awesome!
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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby Gord » Thu Jul 27, 2017 9:27 pm

Upton_O_Goode wrote:For me, it was cathartic.

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=catharsis

catharsis (n.)

1803, "bodily purging," from Latinized form of Greek katharsis "purging, cleansing," from stem of kathairein "to purify, purge," from katharos "pure, clear of dirt, clean, spotless; open, free; clear of shame or guilt; purified" (with most of the extended senses now found in Modern English clear, clean, pure), which is of unknown origin. Originally medical in English; of emotions from 1872; psychotherapy sense first recorded 1909, in Brill's translation of Freud.

Two hundred years ago, that would have meant the discussion made you puke, I guess. :heh: I've had conversations like that!
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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, III

Postby Nikki Nyx » Fri Jul 28, 2017 3:55 am

Upton_O_Goode wrote:Nothing excites an end-timer more than that number 666. (Hexacosia hexeconta hex in Greek, the source of the English word "hex," maybe, I'm not sure. But some manuscripts have it as 606.)
For his novel, The Number of the Beast, Robert Heinlein postulated that the number was actually six raised to the sixth power, the result thereof raised to the sixth power, and that it was mistranslated as "six hundred sixty-six." In the novel, the exponential number was the total possible universes in the multiverse, accessible via the continua device created by one of the main characters. The device was based on three space dimensions and three time dimensions...the first six in the exponential number.
What are the facts? Again and again and again-what are the facts? Shun wishful thinking, ignore divine revelation, forget what “the stars foretell,” avoid opinion, care not what the neighbors think, never mind the unguessable “verdict of history”--what are the facts, and to how many decimal places? You pilot always into an unknown future; facts are your single clue. Get the facts!
—Lazarus Long, from Time Enough for Love, by Robert A. Heinlein

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, III

Postby Upton_O_Goode » Fri Jul 28, 2017 11:38 am

Nikki Nyx wrote:
Upton_O_Goode wrote:Nothing excites an end-timer more than that number 666. (Hexacosia hexeconta hex in Greek, the source of the English word "hex," maybe, I'm not sure. But some manuscripts have it as 606.)
For his novel, The Number of the Beast, Robert Heinlein postulated that the number was actually six raised to the sixth power, the result thereof raised to the sixth power, and that it was mistranslated as "six hundred sixty-six." In the novel, the exponential number was the total possible universes in the multiverse, accessible via the continua device created by one of the main characters. The device was based on three space dimensions and three time dimensions...the first six in the exponential number.


Thanks for the tip. I missed that Heinlein novel, but will get it at the library tomorrow.
"Reserve a part of your wrath ; you have not seen the worst yet. You suppose that this war has been a criminal blunder and an exceptional horror ; you imagine that before long reason will prevail, and all these inferior people that govern the world will be swept aside, and your own party will reform everything and remain always in office. You are mistaken."

George Santayana, "Tipperary" (1918)

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, III

Postby Nikki Nyx » Fri Jul 28, 2017 5:40 pm

Upton_O_Goode wrote:
Nikki Nyx wrote:
Upton_O_Goode wrote:Nothing excites an end-timer more than that number 666. (Hexacosia hexeconta hex in Greek, the source of the English word "hex," maybe, I'm not sure. But some manuscripts have it as 606.)
For his novel, The Number of the Beast, Robert Heinlein postulated that the number was actually six raised to the sixth power, the result thereof raised to the sixth power, and that it was mistranslated as "six hundred sixty-six." In the novel, the exponential number was the total possible universes in the multiverse, accessible via the continua device created by one of the main characters. The device was based on three space dimensions and three time dimensions...the first six in the exponential number.


Thanks for the tip. I missed that Heinlein novel, but will get it at the library tomorrow.
The last chapter, sort of a postscript, will be a bit confusing unless you've read several other Heinlein novels, as he brings in characters from them. Off the top of my head:
Stranger in a Strange Land
Podkayne of Mars although you could skip this one
The Rolling Stones
The Cat Who Walked Through Walls
Time Enough for Love
...and possibly a couple more.
What are the facts? Again and again and again-what are the facts? Shun wishful thinking, ignore divine revelation, forget what “the stars foretell,” avoid opinion, care not what the neighbors think, never mind the unguessable “verdict of history”--what are the facts, and to how many decimal places? You pilot always into an unknown future; facts are your single clue. Get the facts!
—Lazarus Long, from Time Enough for Love, by Robert A. Heinlein

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, III

Postby OlegTheBatty » Fri Jul 28, 2017 5:53 pm

Nikki Nyx wrote:
Upton_O_Goode wrote:
Nikki Nyx wrote:
Upton_O_Goode wrote:Nothing excites an end-timer more than that number 666. (Hexacosia hexeconta hex in Greek, the source of the English word "hex," maybe, I'm not sure. But some manuscripts have it as 606.)
For his novel, The Number of the Beast, Robert Heinlein postulated that the number was actually six raised to the sixth power, the result thereof raised to the sixth power, and that it was mistranslated as "six hundred sixty-six." In the novel, the exponential number was the total possible universes in the multiverse, accessible via the continua device created by one of the main characters. The device was based on three space dimensions and three time dimensions...the first six in the exponential number.


Thanks for the tip. I missed that Heinlein novel, but will get it at the library tomorrow.
The last chapter, sort of a postscript, will be a bit confusing unless you've read several other Heinlein novels, as he brings in characters from them. Off the top of my head:
Stranger in a Strange Land
Podkayne of Mars although you could skip this one
The Rolling Stones
The Cat Who Walked Through Walls
Time Enough for Love
...and possibly a couple more.

The Wizard of Oz, Dodgson's 'Symbolic Logic', and more.

You can understand what's going on without having read them, but much of the richness will be compromised.

I liked Friday better, anyhow.
. . . with the satisfied air of a man who thinks he has an idea of his own because he has commented on the idea of another . . . - Alexandre Dumas 'The Count of Monte Cristo"

There is no statement so absurd that it has not been uttered by some philosopher. - Cicero

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, III

Postby Nikki Nyx » Fri Jul 28, 2017 6:48 pm

OlegTheBatty wrote:
Nikki Nyx wrote:The last chapter, sort of a postscript, will be a bit confusing unless you've read several other Heinlein novels, as he brings in characters from them. Off the top of my head:
Stranger in a Strange Land
Podkayne of Mars although you could skip this one
The Rolling Stones
The Cat Who Walked Through Walls
Time Enough for Love
...and possibly a couple more.

The Wizard of Oz, Dodgson's 'Symbolic Logic', and more.

You can understand what's going on without having read them, but much of the richness will be compromised.

I liked Friday better, anyhow.
Oh, yeah! The main part of the book, too. But if we start listing everything there, we'll be posting spoilers.

I read it the first time, then read the referred to novels I hadn't read, then read it again. It made a huge difference. Still, I loved the whole concept.

Friday is still one of my favorites.
What are the facts? Again and again and again-what are the facts? Shun wishful thinking, ignore divine revelation, forget what “the stars foretell,” avoid opinion, care not what the neighbors think, never mind the unguessable “verdict of history”--what are the facts, and to how many decimal places? You pilot always into an unknown future; facts are your single clue. Get the facts!
—Lazarus Long, from Time Enough for Love, by Robert A. Heinlein

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, III

Postby OlegTheBatty » Fri Jul 28, 2017 7:02 pm

Nikki Nyx wrote:
OlegTheBatty wrote:
Nikki Nyx wrote:The last chapter, sort of a postscript, will be a bit confusing unless you've read several other Heinlein novels, as he brings in characters from them. Off the top of my head:
Stranger in a Strange Land
Podkayne of Mars although you could skip this one
The Rolling Stones
The Cat Who Walked Through Walls
Time Enough for Love
...and possibly a couple more.

The Wizard of Oz, Dodgson's 'Symbolic Logic', and more.

You can understand what's going on without having read them, but much of the richness will be compromised.

I liked Friday better, anyhow.
Oh, yeah! The main part of the book, too. But if we start listing everything there, we'll be posting spoilers.

I read it the first time, then read the referred to novels I hadn't read, then read it again. It made a huge difference. Still, I loved the whole concept.

Friday is still one of my favorites.


I had actually read all of them, which is unusual for me - when there are multiple references like that, I generally miss some of them out of ignorance.
. . . with the satisfied air of a man who thinks he has an idea of his own because he has commented on the idea of another . . . - Alexandre Dumas 'The Count of Monte Cristo"

There is no statement so absurd that it has not been uttered by some philosopher. - Cicero

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby Upton_O_Goode » Fri Jul 28, 2017 8:57 pm

My reading of Heinlein was extensive 50+ years ago, but it's been about that long since I actually looked into anything he wrote. So, thanks to OlegTheBarry and Nikki Nyx for the tips. I'll get started on those reading lists. Best maybe just to look up Heinlein's bio and start with the earliest book that I haven't already read.
"Reserve a part of your wrath ; you have not seen the worst yet. You suppose that this war has been a criminal blunder and an exceptional horror ; you imagine that before long reason will prevail, and all these inferior people that govern the world will be swept aside, and your own party will reform everything and remain always in office. You are mistaken."

George Santayana, "Tipperary" (1918)

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby Nikki Nyx » Sat Jul 29, 2017 12:21 am

I think you should continue this topic. I'm finding the Doctor's statements and your analyses thereof interesting reading.
What are the facts? Again and again and again-what are the facts? Shun wishful thinking, ignore divine revelation, forget what “the stars foretell,” avoid opinion, care not what the neighbors think, never mind the unguessable “verdict of history”--what are the facts, and to how many decimal places? You pilot always into an unknown future; facts are your single clue. Get the facts!
—Lazarus Long, from Time Enough for Love, by Robert A. Heinlein

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby Upton_O_Goode » Thu Aug 31, 2017 11:25 am

Nikki Nyx wrote:I think you should continue this topic. I'm finding the Doctor's statements and your analyses thereof interesting reading.


Sorry for the delay in replying, and thanks for the suggestion. I have started too many threads and can't keep up with all of them. Will resume this one at a later time.
"Reserve a part of your wrath ; you have not seen the worst yet. You suppose that this war has been a criminal blunder and an exceptional horror ; you imagine that before long reason will prevail, and all these inferior people that govern the world will be swept aside, and your own party will reform everything and remain always in office. You are mistaken."

George Santayana, "Tipperary" (1918)

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Re: The Wit and Wisdom of Jack Van Impe, I

Postby Nikki Nyx » Fri Sep 01, 2017 1:04 am

No worries! I completely understand.
What are the facts? Again and again and again-what are the facts? Shun wishful thinking, ignore divine revelation, forget what “the stars foretell,” avoid opinion, care not what the neighbors think, never mind the unguessable “verdict of history”--what are the facts, and to how many decimal places? You pilot always into an unknown future; facts are your single clue. Get the facts!
—Lazarus Long, from Time Enough for Love, by Robert A. Heinlein


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