People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

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Nikki Nyx
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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby Nikki Nyx » Thu Jun 22, 2017 7:41 pm

Electro432 wrote:Lunanik, hello, and thanks for your consideted posts.

I see that in terms of mediums et al there may well be a brain chemistry/physics solution to any dubious woo. States such as hypnogogia were part of Tesla and Wagners's life to mention a few creative genious personalities - suggesting a link to creative problem solving networks?

The functioning of the amygdala may reveal much in terms of emotional problem solving? I seek answers as educational person, as so called brain function abberations are my bread and butter, so I'm curious as to what yourself and others think of how brain chemistry affects cognitive and motor function. If I've been vague, feel free to ask as to why.

Greetings, Electro, and welcome to the forum!

I've experienced hypnagogia, and it certainly has provided fodder for horrific short stories, so there's that. The hallucinations were quite realistic, complete with color, texture, articulation, movement, and sometimes sound effects. They never failed to scare the living daylights out of me, but not for reasons you might think. As a skeptic, my fear was reality-based; I was worried about what the diagnosis might be. Fortunately, it was relatively benign: a rare sleep disorder that consisted of alpha waves intruding into delta sleep. With treatment, the hypnagogia gradually stopped and has not recurred. I'm doubtful that hypnagogia is connected to creative problem-solving networks in the brain, but only because most people who experience them think they're being haunted or possessed. They believe their senses, rather than using their creative problem-solving skills.

Brain chemistry certainly has effects on cognitive and motor functions. Mood disorders qualify as neurochemical dysfunctions and, when untreated, they all have cognitive and physiological symptoms.

Ok, I'll bite: Why are you being vague?
What are the facts? Again and again and again-what are the facts? Shun wishful thinking, ignore divine revelation, forget what “the stars foretell,” avoid opinion, care not what the neighbors think, never mind the unguessable “verdict of history”--what are the facts, and to how many decimal places? You pilot always into an unknown future; facts are your single clue. Get the facts!
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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby scrmbldggs » Thu Jun 22, 2017 7:59 pm

LunaNik wrote:I'm doubtful that hypnagogia is connected to creative problem-solving networks in the brain, but only because most people who experience them think they're being haunted or possessed. They believe their senses, rather than using their creative problem-solving skills.

What if their creative problem-solving networks are shaped by religious/superstitious conditioning?
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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby Nikki Nyx » Thu Jun 22, 2017 9:17 pm

scrmbldggs wrote:
LunaNik wrote:I'm doubtful that hypnagogia is connected to creative problem-solving networks in the brain, but only because most people who experience them think they're being haunted or possessed. They believe their senses, rather than using their creative problem-solving skills.

What if their creative problem-solving networks are shaped by religious/superstitious conditioning?

Then all questions go into the wastebasket labeled "god." *dusts off hands* Also, for those people, it's not really a creative problem-solving network; it's more of a binary problem sorter with one input and two outputs.
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What are the facts? Again and again and again-what are the facts? Shun wishful thinking, ignore divine revelation, forget what “the stars foretell,” avoid opinion, care not what the neighbors think, never mind the unguessable “verdict of history”--what are the facts, and to how many decimal places? You pilot always into an unknown future; facts are your single clue. Get the facts!
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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby Lance Kennedy » Thu Jun 22, 2017 9:21 pm

Electro

You do not have to be a scientist to make a positive contribution here. Most of us are not professional scientists. All you need is to be able to think in a rational way. If you lack knowledge on a particular subject, just ask Mr. Google. All the rest of us do. The key thing is to have a good bullsh*t alarm so that you can avoid crappy web sites. I look forward to your posts.

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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby Electro432 » Sun Jun 25, 2017 7:51 pm

scrmbldggs wrote:Hi, Electro. Welcome to the gather.

Electro432 wrote:...I'm curious as to...how brain chemistry affects cognitive and motor function.

Interesting food for thought. For a chemistry aspect, scroll down to "A Pathway to Pleasure".

Cheers for that. Very interesting to read about the impact of novelty on our processing procedures. I'm also interested in why things appear to go wrong in terms of the children I teach, some of whom are on the autistic spectrum. Visual aberrations are common alongside other sensory processing issues.

I looked to see if I could find anything on the side effects off oxytocin in terms of hypnagogia. All I have found so far was the usual about eye contact between parents and babies and the other loved up stuff.


If I've been vague, feel free to ask as to why.

Why? :-P

Why?

Because I have no scientific training, I lack the vocab and background knowledge, however it seems that this is excusable according to Lance, hopefully I won't be in too much trouble :sinking:

Thanks guys
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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby Electro432 » Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:01 pm

Greetings, Electro, and welcome to the forum!

I've experienced hypnagogia, and it certainly has provided fodder for horrific short stories, so there's that. The hallucinations were quite realistic, complete with color, texture, articulation, movement, and sometimes sound effects. They never failed to scare the living daylights out of me, but not for reasons you might think. As a skeptic, my fear was reality-based; I was worried about what the diagnosis might be. Fortunately, it was relatively benign: a rare sleep disorder that consisted of alpha waves intruding into delta sleep. With treatment, the hypnagogia gradually stopped and has not recurred. I'm doubtful that hypnagogia is connected to creative problem-solving networks in the brain, but only because most people who experience them think they're being haunted or possessed. They believe their senses, rather than using their creative problem-solving skills.

Brain chemistry certainly has effects on cognitive and motor functions. Mood disorders qualify as neurochemical dysfunctions and, when untreated, they all have cognitive and physiological symptoms.

Ok, I'll bite: Why are you being vague?[/quote]

Hello Lunanik, it's very interesting to hear that you have experienced hypnagogia. I experienced something similar during the period I nursed my baby. The effects appeared around the time of ten days after birth and once I stopped lactating, so did the visuals. Some friends were worried I might have had a brain tumour, but this was not the case. Perhaps sleep deprivation was also a contributing factor alongside the hormonal rush?

I once worked with a pupil who came with a diagnosis of hypnagogia. The mother reported that the child was very active during periods of sleep and that sleep was disrupted.
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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby Nikki Nyx » Sun Jun 25, 2017 9:38 pm

Electro432 wrote:Hello Lunanik, it's very interesting to hear that you have experienced hypnagogia. I experienced something similar during the period I nursed my baby. The effects appeared around the time of ten days after birth and once I stopped lactating, so did the visuals. Some friends were worried I might have had a brain tumour, but this was not the case. Perhaps sleep deprivation was also a contributing factor alongside the hormonal rush?

I once worked with a pupil who came with a diagnosis of hypnagogia. The mother reported that the child was very active during periods of sleep and that sleep was disrupted.

There's quite a bit of literature describing the effects of sleep deprivation. Here's one study which showed that perceptual distortion and cognitive disorganization increased hugely after only one night of sleep deprivation in healthy college students. The participants were screened to remove volunteers with mental disorders, drug users, and those on regular medications.
Image
What are the facts? Again and again and again-what are the facts? Shun wishful thinking, ignore divine revelation, forget what “the stars foretell,” avoid opinion, care not what the neighbors think, never mind the unguessable “verdict of history”--what are the facts, and to how many decimal places? You pilot always into an unknown future; facts are your single clue. Get the facts!
—Lazarus Long, from Time Enough for Love, by Robert A. Heinlein

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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby Electro432 » Mon Jun 26, 2017 11:04 pm

Thanks Luna. I'm in the process of reading. It seems also relevant to the job I do in terms of my further understanding sensory behaviours.
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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby gorgeous » Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:14 pm

fox------A longtime Washington socialite is raising eyebrows with her new book on spirituality as she claims the hexes she put on three people in the past may have led to their deaths.

Sally Quinn – a journalist who was famously married to Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee – admits to being an Occultist in her new "spiritual memoir" titled Finding Magic.

Quinn says she feels guilty about her hexes and won’t do them anymore. She also says she refuses to cast a spell on President Trump as some of her friends have asked.

“Believe me, since Trump was elected, and since the election, I can’t tell you how many friends have asked me to put a hex on Donald Trump, and I won’t do it,” Quinn said in a book interview with USA Today. “I just said no. I don’t do that anymore.”

Quinn also claims all the women in her family are psychic. She said her mother also put hexes on two people who died.

“They were two people who had hurt me very badly and she just said to both of them, ‘I hope you drop dead,’ and they did, and I saw her do it,” she said.


Quinn says she was either in her late 20s or early 30s when she put hexes on three people who “hurt” her.

“I had never done it before,” she said. “What I wanted to have happen was for them to feel what I had felt. I didn’t mean for them to die.”
Science Fundamentalism...is exactly what happens when there’s a significant, perceived ideological threat to one’s traditions and identity.

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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby bobbo_the_Pragmatist » Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:23 pm

gorgeous wrote: Quinn says she was either in her late 20s or early 30s when she put hexes on three people who “hurt” her.

Hard to imagine anyone being this stupid. This includes YOU and Quinn.

"I hope/curse/hex you to die." /// 100% outcome................... Guess why?
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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby Confidencia » Thu Sep 21, 2017 12:39 pm

Anthony wrote: I'm legitimately getting stressed out over this to be honest.


If you are getting stressed out over it then perhaps you should do some meditation for yourself and see what comes up. In life you normally get out what you put in. If you believe and do the work you will get the result according to you effort and level of earnestness. Above all you must be interested, otherwise nothing can happen.

You are coming here and asking people who have no experience in these matters therefore are not qualified to give you a concise answer. Of course you are going to find charlatans in all walks of life but that doesn't mean that something is untrue. Beside what can you expect to gain by consulting a book worm? They barely know themselves let alone anybody else. At best they can give you some formula that fits with the general consensus of conventional wisdom. If the mysteries of life could be found in a book then Life would be square, a bit like some of these folks here.

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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby Matthew Ellard » Thu Sep 21, 2017 11:25 pm

Anthony wrote: I'm legitimately getting stressed out over this to be honest.

Confidencia wrote:If you are getting stressed out over it then perhaps you should.........


The reason Anthony's account has the words "account suspended" is because Pyrrho identified him as a sockpuppet of a troll, after someone made a formal complaint.

Would you like me to lodge a formal complaint about you Shaka?

PS : Your observational powers really suck.
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Re: People who believe their powers, skepticism, etc

Postby TJrandom » Fri Sep 22, 2017 10:37 pm

gorgeous wrote:... new book on spirituality as she claims the hexes she put on three people in the past may have led to their deaths. ...


I just put a hex on every human and animal life form that was born before the year 1800. Many millions died, mind you. Gee, if I were to write a book on spirituality and wonder if I had caused their deaths - would it help my book sell? :roll:


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