English multitopic

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Poodle
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Poodle » Thu Jun 15, 2017 6:47 am

Going from north to south ...
Ma lum ...
Me chumley ...
My chimney ...

And you think YOU have problems.

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Re: English multitopic

Postby JO 753 » Thu Jun 15, 2017 3:18 pm

I didnt need any tranzlationz. Go ahed & try a few sentensez.
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Poodle » Thu Jun 15, 2017 3:33 pm

LunaNik wrote:... A short conversation somewhere in the South...
"Jeet?"
"Naw joo?"
"Naw skoo-eet."


Wilds of Yorkshire version ...
Astadtheedinner?
Nay. Worrabartthee?
Nay. Lessgooairt.
To make matters worse, the first t in "Worrabartthee" would actually be a glottal stop.

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Re: English multitopic

Postby LunaNik » Fri Jun 16, 2017 2:45 am

Poodle wrote:Going from north to south ...
Ma lum ...
Me chumley ...
My chimney ...

And you think YOU have problems.

Well, I can add to the problem: there are different vocabularies in addition to different dialects. Probably the most common one is the word for this:
Image
In my part of New England, it's a grinder. In the Deep South, it's a po'boy. Mostly everywhere else, it's a sub, except where it's a hoagie or a hero.
...it used to be so simple, once upon a time.
Because the universe was full of ignorance all around and the scientist panned through it like a prospector crouched over a mountain stream, looking for the gold of knowledge among the gravel of unreason, the sand of uncertainty, and the little whiskery eight-legged swimming things of superstition.
—Terry Pratchett, from Witches Abroad

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Re: English multitopic

Postby LunaNik » Fri Jun 16, 2017 2:46 am

Poodle wrote:
LunaNik wrote:... A short conversation somewhere in the South...
"Jeet?"
"Naw joo?"
"Naw skoo-eet."


Wilds of Yorkshire version ...
Astadtheedinner?
Nay. Worrabartthee?
Nay. Lessgooairt.
To make matters worse, the first t in "Worrabartthee" would actually be a glottal stop.

I can understand that reading it, but I probably wouldn't be able to just by listening.
...it used to be so simple, once upon a time.
Because the universe was full of ignorance all around and the scientist panned through it like a prospector crouched over a mountain stream, looking for the gold of knowledge among the gravel of unreason, the sand of uncertainty, and the little whiskery eight-legged swimming things of superstition.
—Terry Pratchett, from Witches Abroad

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Re: English multitopic

Postby LunaNik » Fri Jun 16, 2017 3:08 am

JO 753 wrote:I didnt need any tranzlationz. Go ahed & try a few sentensez.

"Hah! Kinnah hail pew?"
"Jew puttin ayuhd inna paypurr boutcher kayut?"
"Yut. Yew fixinna getta kee-utty?"
"Ah shore ayum, iffin yew steel gut enny."
"Wayell, yerinn luck. Ah gut wan left. Cumminna howss. Mahnd thu stayup."

(I've never in my life seen so many squiggly red underlines in anything I've typed...lol.)
...it used to be so simple, once upon a time.
Because the universe was full of ignorance all around and the scientist panned through it like a prospector crouched over a mountain stream, looking for the gold of knowledge among the gravel of unreason, the sand of uncertainty, and the little whiskery eight-legged swimming things of superstition.
—Terry Pratchett, from Witches Abroad

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Gord » Fri Jun 16, 2017 6:13 am

LunaNik wrote:Image
In my part of New England, it's a grinder. In the Deep South, it's a po'boy. Mostly everywhere else, it's a sub, except where it's a hoagie or a hero.

Sammich!
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Re: English multitopic

Postby TJrandom » Fri Jun 16, 2017 10:56 am

A dogs breakfast...

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Re: English multitopic

Postby JO 753 » Fri Jun 16, 2017 11:00 am

LunaNik wrote:"Hah! Kinnah hail pew?"
"Jew puttin ayuhd inna paypurr boutcher kayut?"
"Yut. Yew fixinna getta kee-utty?"
"Ah shore ayum, iffin yew steel gut enny."
"Wayell, yerinn luck. Ah gut wan left. Cumminna howss. Mahnd thu stayup."


"Are you putting an ad in the paper about your cat?"

"Yes. Are you working on getting a kitten?"

"I sure am, if you still have any."

"Well, you're in luck. I have one left. Come in the house. Mind the step."
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Re: English multitopic

Postby Monster » Fri Jun 16, 2017 1:59 pm

LunaNik wrote:
Poodle wrote:Going from north to south ...
Ma lum ...
Me chumley ...
My chimney ...

And you think YOU have problems.

Well, I can add to the problem: there are different vocabularies in addition to different dialects. Probably the most common one is the word for this:
Image
In my part of New England, it's a grinder. In the Deep South, it's a po'boy. Mostly everywhere else, it's a sub, except where it's a hoagie or a hero.

In Stamford, it's called a "wedge". In some other places, it's called a "sub" or "submarine sandwich".

:)
Listening twice as much as you speak is a sign of wisdom.

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Re: English multitopic

Postby LunaNik » Fri Jun 16, 2017 3:06 pm

Monster wrote:
LunaNik wrote:Probably the most common one is the word for this:
Image
In my part of New England, it's a grinder. In the Deep South, it's a po'boy. Mostly everywhere else, it's a sub, except where it's a hoagie or a hero.

In Stamford, it's called a "wedge". In some other places, it's called a "sub" or "submarine sandwich".

:)

I hadn't heard the term "wedge" before. Any idea on the history? Allegedly, "grinder" stems from its original form included ground meat.
...it used to be so simple, once upon a time.
Because the universe was full of ignorance all around and the scientist panned through it like a prospector crouched over a mountain stream, looking for the gold of knowledge among the gravel of unreason, the sand of uncertainty, and the little whiskery eight-legged swimming things of superstition.
—Terry Pratchett, from Witches Abroad

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Monster » Fri Jun 16, 2017 6:06 pm

LunaNik wrote:
Monster wrote:
LunaNik wrote:Probably the most common one is the word for this:
Image
In my part of New England, it's a grinder. In the Deep South, it's a po'boy. Mostly everywhere else, it's a sub, except where it's a hoagie or a hero.

In Stamford, it's called a "wedge". In some other places, it's called a "sub" or "submarine sandwich".

:)

I hadn't heard the term "wedge" before. Any idea on the history? Allegedly, "grinder" stems from its original form included ground meat.

This has some info.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Submarine_sandwich
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Re: English multitopic

Postby JO 753 » Sat Jun 17, 2017 3:28 am

JO 753 wrote:
LunaNik wrote:"Hah! Kinnah hail pew?"


"Hi! Can I help you?" Had me stumped on 'hail pew' till now.
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Re: English multitopic

Postby LunaNik » Sat Jun 17, 2017 3:32 am

JO 753 wrote:
LunaNik wrote:"Hah! Kinnah hail pew?"
"Jew puttin ayuhd inna paypurr boutcher kayut?"
"Yut. Yew fixinna getta kee-utty?"
"Ah shore ayum, iffin yew steel gut enny."
"Wayell, yerinn luck. Ah gut wan left. Cumminna howss. Mahnd thu stayup."


"Are you putting an ad in the paper about your cat?"

"Yes. Are you working on getting a kitten?"

"I sure am, if you still have any."

"Well, you're in luck. I have one left. Come in the house. Mind the step."

Pretty close!
"Hi! Can I help you?"
"Did you put an ad in the paper about your cat?"
"Yes. Are you interested in getting a kitten? (Yep. You fixing to get a kitty?)"
"I sure am, if you still have (got) any."
"Well, you're in luck. I have (got) one left. Come in the house. Mind the step."
...it used to be so simple, once upon a time.
Because the universe was full of ignorance all around and the scientist panned through it like a prospector crouched over a mountain stream, looking for the gold of knowledge among the gravel of unreason, the sand of uncertainty, and the little whiskery eight-legged swimming things of superstition.
—Terry Pratchett, from Witches Abroad

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Re: English multitopic

Postby JO 753 » Sat Jun 17, 2017 4:50 am

I wuz tranzlating to correct grammar also. (trying at least)
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Re: English multitopic

Postby LunaNik » Sat Jun 17, 2017 11:10 pm

JO 753 wrote:I wuz tranzlating to correct grammar also. (trying at least)

I did notice that! :wgrin:
...it used to be so simple, once upon a time.
Because the universe was full of ignorance all around and the scientist panned through it like a prospector crouched over a mountain stream, looking for the gold of knowledge among the gravel of unreason, the sand of uncertainty, and the little whiskery eight-legged swimming things of superstition.
—Terry Pratchett, from Witches Abroad

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Re: English multitopic

Postby ElectricMonk » Mon Jun 19, 2017 8:44 am

Image

It looks like a prescription for a coronary bypass.
I've come up with a set of rules that describe our reactions to technologies:
1. Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.
2. Anything that's invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.
3. Anything invented after you're thirty-five is against the natural order of things.
- Douglas Adams

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Re: English multitopic

Postby Gord » Tue Jun 20, 2017 6:35 am

ElectricMonk wrote:It looks like a prescription for a coronary bypass.

Ugh, don't remind me of the barbecue I went to on Saturday.

After it was over, I had to "finish off the ice cream". It was a quarter of a gallon. And someone had dumped a half litre of whipped cream on top of it without mentioning it to me.

I can hear my blood moving through my veins today. It's going "squitch, squitch, squitch". :?

Also, my shirt doesn't seem to fit today. It's like someone stuffed a pillow under there.

http://www.gocomics.com/foxtrot/2017/06/18

Yeah. Like that.

Also, it's four pillows, not one.
"Knowledge grows through infinite timelessness" -- the random fictional Deepak Chopra quote site
"You are also taking my words out of context." -- Justin
"Nullius in verba" -- The Royal Society ["take nobody's word for it"]
#ANDAMOVIE

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Re: English multitopic

Postby ElectricMonk » Tue Jun 20, 2017 6:57 am

calorie
noun \ cal·o·rie \ˈka-lə-rē, ˈkal-rē\

Definition: Small critter that comes out to sew your clothes a bit tighter every time you sleep.
I've come up with a set of rules that describe our reactions to technologies:
1. Anything that is in the world when you’re born is normal and ordinary and is just a natural part of the way the world works.
2. Anything that's invented between when you’re fifteen and thirty-five is new and exciting and revolutionary and you can probably get a career in it.
3. Anything invented after you're thirty-five is against the natural order of things.
- Douglas Adams


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