Women's Ways of Knowing

How should we think about weird things?
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Lance Kennedy
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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby Lance Kennedy » Mon Jul 31, 2017 12:14 am

Just like "evidence " for alien visits. All unsupported anecdotes.

Now you can move onto unsupported anecdotes for witches, demons, angels, giants and leprechauns. Oh, and don't forget sea serpents.

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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby gorgeous » Mon Jul 31, 2017 12:24 am

where is the evidence that proves you exist??
Science Fundamentalism...is exactly what happens when there’s a significant, perceived ideological threat to one’s traditions and identity.

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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby Matthew Ellard » Mon Jul 31, 2017 12:34 am

gorgeous wrote:where is the evidence that proves you exist??
His passport and birth certificate. :lol:

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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby TJrandom » Mon Jul 31, 2017 1:13 am

That isn`t the way biopsies are taken. Biopsies are taken to confirm the type/grade of strongly suspected cancers on the part of the doctors, not to confirm some silly notion that cancer might be present on the part of the would-be patient.

And while we are on the topic of women`s ways of knowing.... There are lots of things people `know` that are simply not accurate/true/factual. Knowing is ridiculous when that knowledge is false.

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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby Nikki Nyx » Mon Jul 31, 2017 2:37 am

Speaking of authorities who should know better chipping away at equality...

"What did you do yesterday?" a friend asks. You stop and think about it for a minute, but can't remember. Everything seems like a blur, and it certainly wasn't because you spent the night at the bar. But what did you do?

Due to the ever-increasing demands of our multi-tasking, I'm-too-busy society, a day's work can feel overwhelming and chaotic. Between picking kids up from school, answering emails and text messages, doing laundry, and taking care of family members, we lose ourselves somewhere along the way. This is particularly a problem for women, especially during menopause.

Dr. Libby Weaver, an author and biochemist from Australia, calls this phenomenon "Rushing Woman Syndrome." According to her, today's lifestyle makes too many demands on women, causing them to be "in a permanent state of stress." Women are simply doing too much, and technology is partly to blame. LINK
This is one of the silliest things I've read recently. Over-scheduling yourself, then getting stressed is not a syndrome. Learn to say "no" and start parceling out the housework, ffs. Stop trying to live up to Cosmo's expectation of the modern superwoman, which doesn't exist. Sheesh. (Oh, for those who don't know, and before the cries of sexism begin, I'm female. And, yes, I worked full-time and raised my daughter by myself, while owning my own home...and never could have done it without being a realist and having the utterly necessary help of my family, including my daughter.)
What are the facts? Again and again and again-what are the facts? Shun wishful thinking, ignore divine revelation, forget what “the stars foretell,” avoid opinion, care not what the neighbors think, never mind the unguessable “verdict of history”--what are the facts, and to how many decimal places? You pilot always into an unknown future; facts are your single clue. Get the facts!
—Lazarus Long, from Time Enough for Love, by Robert A. Heinlein

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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby TJrandom » Mon Jul 31, 2017 3:26 am

Nikki Nyx wrote:Speaking of authorities who should know better chipping away at equality...

"What did you do yesterday?" a friend asks. You stop and think about it for a minute, but can't remember. Everything seems like a blur, and it certainly wasn't because you spent the night at the bar. But what did you do?

Due to the ever-increasing demands of our multi-tasking, I'm-too-busy society, a day's work can feel overwhelming and chaotic. Between picking kids up from school, answering emails and text messages, doing laundry, and taking care of family members, we lose ourselves somewhere along the way. This is particularly a problem for women, especially during menopause.

Dr. Libby Weaver, an author and biochemist from Australia, calls this phenomenon "Rushing Woman Syndrome." According to her, today's lifestyle makes too many demands on women, causing them to be "in a permanent state of stress." Women are simply doing too much, and technology is partly to blame. LINK
This is one of the silliest things I've read recently. Over-scheduling yourself, then getting stressed is not a syndrome. Learn to say "no" and start parceling out the housework, ffs. Stop trying to live up to Cosmo's expectation of the modern superwoman, which doesn't exist. Sheesh. (Oh, for those who don't know, and before the cries of sexism begin, I'm female. And, yes, I worked full-time and raised my daughter by myself, while owning my own home...and never could have done it without being a realist and having the utterly necessary help of my family, including my daughter.)


Erm... you aren`t a pilot too, are ya?

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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby Nikki Nyx » Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:00 am

Nope. Just someone who disagrees with coining new syndromes to provide idiots with excuses for their behavior. I put "Rushing Woman Syndrome" in the same category as "Affluenza." Pure BS.

I mean, look at the way Weaver words it: "today's lifestyle makes too many demands on women." Really? My great-grandmother raised six children, cared for a half-acre vegetable garden, cooked and baked everything from scratch, canned and preserved everything from the garden, kept her house spotless inside and out, did laundry for eight by hand with a wringer and clothesline for most of her life, and lived to be 96, outliving her husband. Talk about the demands of the lifestyle; yesteryear's lifestyle barely allowed for time to sleep.

But today, with every modern convenience, women are overstressed? And technology is to blame? Ridiculous.
What are the facts? Again and again and again-what are the facts? Shun wishful thinking, ignore divine revelation, forget what “the stars foretell,” avoid opinion, care not what the neighbors think, never mind the unguessable “verdict of history”--what are the facts, and to how many decimal places? You pilot always into an unknown future; facts are your single clue. Get the facts!
—Lazarus Long, from Time Enough for Love, by Robert A. Heinlein

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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby TJrandom » Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:15 am

Nikki Nyx wrote:Nope. Just someone who disagrees with coining new syndromes to provide idiots with excuses for their behavior. I put "Rushing Woman Syndrome" in the same category as "Affluenza." Pure BS.

I mean, look at the way Weaver words it: "today's lifestyle makes too many demands on women." Really? My great-grandmother raised six children, cared for a half-acre vegetable garden, cooked and baked everything from scratch, canned and preserved everything from the garden, kept her house spotless inside and out, did laundry for eight by hand with a wringer and clothesline for most of her life, and lived to be 96, outliving her husband. Talk about the demands of the lifestyle; yesteryear's lifestyle barely allowed for time to sleep.

But today, with every modern convenience, women are overstressed? And technology is to blame? Ridiculous.


Agreed - I`ve known wonderwomen like your great-grandmother. And as a minor niggle, but also a testiment - they raised their older children to help raise the younger children in the family, learn to work and share the workload, acquire life skills, and become accomplished adults.

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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby Lance Kennedy » Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:23 am

Those women of legend did work hard and achieve a lot. But it is worth remembering that they did not have to meet the same standards. For example, a bath tub was regarded as an outrageous luxury in most of the 19th century, and cleanliness of body and of clothes was not what we expect today. Keeping a house "spotless " without a vacuum cleaner did not happen normally, unless servants were involved.

No disrespect intended, but people are people and always have been. Not supermen or superwoman.

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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby TJrandom » Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:40 am

Lance Kennedy wrote:Those women of legend did work hard and achieve a lot. But it is worth remembering that they did not have to meet the same standards. For example, a bath tub was regarded as an outrageous luxury in most of the 19th century, and cleanliness of body and of clothes was not what we expect today. Keeping a house "spotless " without a vacuum cleaner did not happen normally, unless servants were involved.

No disrespect intended, but people are people and always have been. Not supermen or superwoman.


Yes, but they also milked the cow, slaughtered and scalded the chickens, skinned the rabbits and squirrels, gutted the fish, picked the berries, sewed the clothes, gave the haircuts, etc., etc. I`m still in wonder women territory.

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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby bobbo_the_Pragmatist » Mon Jul 31, 2017 12:49 pm

Lance Kennedy wrote:Those women of legend did work hard and achieve a lot. But it is worth remembering that they did not have to meet the same standards.
I'll wager right now that Lance while relying on this for his meaningless quibble actually never states a standard and applies it.
xxx
Lance Kennedy wrote:For example, a bath tub was regarded as an outrageous luxury in most of the 19th century, and cleanliness of body and of clothes was not what we expect today.
So... what is the standard and how was it met then and now?.............anything????
xxx
Lance Kennedy wrote:..., and cleanliness of body and of clothes was not what we expect today.
So....you spend hours washing body and clothes and neither are as clean as we have today after spending minutes.....so the effort put into it negated by the results? Seems to me more effort for less results is the very definition of more onerous.
xxx
Lance Kennedy wrote: Keeping a house "spotless " without a vacuum cleaner did not happen normally, unless servants were involved.
Ok.......there is a standard I guess: spotless house? Its my impression that the spotless house is women's work? Women's work then, womens work now. Ha, ha.....the only vacuuming I would do is buy a Rhomba?? But back to the defect in your commentary: how much work did it take to keep an earlier era house as clean as standards demanded compared to now? Again: the effort required, not the results achieved. Seems to me lots of movies show "scrub women" on their hands and knees washing the floors. No vacuum cleaners: bucket and mop. I know I would choose the rhomba.
xxx
Lance Kennedy wrote:.... unless servants were involved.
All the kiddies were watching tv.... right?

xxx
Lance Kennedy wrote:No disrespect intended, but people are people and always have been. Not supermen or superwoman.
You're right. Most, just as dumb and caught by their own perceptions as ever. The societies they lived in, the available technologies and options available, had no effect on their choices and life styles at all.

Is this your "considered" opinion Lance?
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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby Lance Kennedy » Mon Jul 31, 2017 8:19 pm

Bobbo

I have lived in several different 'more primitive ' societies where modern appliances are less available. Where, for example, women wash clothes in the local stream by hand. So I have seen what happens. The 'standard ' you talk of varies from person to person and family to family. But, for example, where I put on a clean shirt every day, those guys will wear the same one for a week. For personal hygiene, things change also. When the only source of hot water is heated over a wood fire, and there is no bath tub or shower, then having a good wash may also be only once a week.

Take a good look at yourself, Bobbo.
The criticism you posted was unnecessary, trivial and ludicrous. It reflects on you, not me, making you look mean and small minded.

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Re: Women's Ways of Knowing

Postby Nikki Nyx » Mon Jul 31, 2017 8:24 pm

Lance Kennedy wrote:Those women of legend did work hard and achieve a lot. But it is worth remembering that they did not have to meet the same standards. For example, a bath tub was regarded as an outrageous luxury in most of the 19th century, and cleanliness of body and of clothes was not what we expect today. Keeping a house "spotless " without a vacuum cleaner did not happen normally, unless servants were involved.

No disrespect intended, but people are people and always have been. Not supermen or superwoman.
Very true, Lance. And no offense taken at all. I think the problem arises when people attempt to live up to some mythical societal expectations...instead of setting reasonable expectations for themselves.

Today's women cannot be Superwoman any more than yesteryear's women were. From my great-grandmother's perspective, hard work was just part and parcel of everyday life. She wouldn't have considered herself to be Superwoman. Plus, she had help from all of her kids, who both had jobs and helped around the house. All of them lived at home until they got married...and made time to help after that too.

I mentioned the things I did; I didn't consider myself to be Superwoman either. It's a matter of prioritizing and deciding for yourself where to spend your time. That way, you don't spread yourself so thin that everything and everyone suffers, including you.

An example...
• My brother and his wife always make a separate special dinner for my niece. She's five years old now, and never eats the meal the rest of us are eating. Had they not started doing this when she was younger, they wouldn't have the extra stress of having to do it now. I worry that she lacks proper nutrients, since the only meat she'll eat is hotdogs and processed chicken fingers.
• OTOH, my parents made my brother and me sit at the table until we finished the plate. Unnecessary stress for everyone.
• My daughter always ate the same meals as the rest of the family, as soon as she was on solid food. My rule was that she try three bites of a new food, chewed and swallowed. If she still didn't like it after that, I didn't force her to eat it. Sometimes she would like it. If not, we'd try it again after a few months had passed and her palate changed. Less stressful for both of us, and she didn't developed hang-ups about food. There were never battles at the dinner table. Dinner time should be enjoyable.

Not that I didn't make mistakes! LOL...everyone does. It's not like there's a parenting manual. But you do have to choose where to spend your time and energy for the best result. Sometimes, what seems like the easiest option in the moment ends up being the worst option in the long run.
What are the facts? Again and again and again-what are the facts? Shun wishful thinking, ignore divine revelation, forget what “the stars foretell,” avoid opinion, care not what the neighbors think, never mind the unguessable “verdict of history”--what are the facts, and to how many decimal places? You pilot always into an unknown future; facts are your single clue. Get the facts!
—Lazarus Long, from Time Enough for Love, by Robert A. Heinlein


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